break-even point

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break-even point

[brā′kē·vən ‚pȯint]
(industrial engineering)
The point at which a company neither makes a profit nor suffers a loss from the operations of the business, and at which total costs are equal to total sales volume.

break-even point

In the process of implementing a new computer language, the point at which the language is sufficiently effective that one can implement the language in itself. That is, for a new language called, hypothetically, FOOGOL, one has reached break-even when one can write a demonstration compiler for FOOGOL in FOOGOL, discard the original implementation language, and thereafter use working versions of FOOGOL to develop newer ones. This is an important milestone. See My Favourite Toy Language.

[There actually is a language called Foogol].
References in periodicals archive ?
Two of the most useful calculations are the breakeven point and margin of safety.
Airbus has sharply raised the breakeven point for its A380 superjumbo to take into account two-year delays in delivering the first of the new jets to airlines and cash shortfalls in the aircraft project.
Papert says Maine officials place that breakeven point at $70 per year per child.
So far, the venture is close to the breakeven point, he said, because most of the revenue has been reinvested into marketing, sales and stock.
This breakeven point stopping criterion will ensure that Upstart continues to build a more and more precise model of the data set until the benefits associated with the classification scheme sufficiently outweigh the costs associated with the classification scheme.
Fiat Auto should hit the operating breakeven point in 2005, helped by new-car launches and cost savings from joint ventures with ten per cent owner General Motors.
The four-page Application Note offers a concise primer on calculating a mailing breakeven point, and it explains marginal costs, calculating income from a mailing, mailing response rates, the worth of an order, and using the QuickFill calculator to figure out the results from all these factors.
The breakeven point above which the potential mortality savings outweighs the cost of the requirement is then calculated by dividing the cost of the underwriting requirement by the mortality savings.
The retiring partner should be paid less, by finding the breakeven point at which the tax consequences to the remaining partners would be the same if ordinary payments were made and deducted as paid, versus goodwill payments being paid and deducted over 15 years.
The breakeven point is calculated as the ratio of the fixed expenses to the contribution margin ratio.
You need a balance sheet and a cash-flow analysis, plus a sensible projection of when you might reach your breakeven point.