Breathing zone


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Breathing zone

The region within an occupied space between planes, 3 and 6 feet above the floor and more than 2 feet from the walls or fixed air-conditioning equipment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 6 shows that supply air temperature has nearly no impact on the distribution of mean contaminant concentration in the breathing zone for the four hybrid systems when supply air temperature was between 15.
Since a N95 filtering face piece respirator greatly reduces a wide size range of particles from entering the wearer's breathing zone and protects the user from both droplet and airborne particles, it does afford the clinician protection.
The VC-1 case results in similar breathing zone levels of "A" to the human body ozone reaction products from Rim et al.
Although the manikins inhale through their mouths in the upper zone, they inhale a large amount of air from the lower (cleaner) zone because this air is transported up to the breathing zone by the thermal boundary layer around the manikins (Brohus and Nielsen 1996).
One of six personal breathing zone air samples for lead exceeded the Occupational Safety and Health Administration action limit (OSHA AL) of 30 micrograms per cubic meter ([mu]g/[m.
To minimize employee exposure when emptying, the machine is opened with the motor running, creating an airflow away from the operators breathing zone.
An automatic safety controller displays, monitors, and maintains proper airflow to ensure fumes and vapors do not enter the operator's breathing zone.
Methodology: Total dusts were collected within the workers' breathing zone using a Personal Air Sampler (PAS) and respirable dusts were measured using a real time monitor (Micro Dust Pro) with a particle size adapter in different parts of the factory.
These levels are generated right at the breathing zone of the patient, the dentist, and the dental assistant
The highest paraquat air concentration measured during the 25 min spray application at operator's breathing zone was 125 ug m-3 that was slightly above the TLV (threshold limit value) and REL (recommended exposure limit) (100 ug m-3 ) of ACIGH (American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists) and NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1994).
In the United States, OSHA PEL (permissible exposure levels) requirements for styrene require that the breathing zone within the workplace average less than 50 ppm (parts per million) over an 8 hour period.
If the air takes a shortcut, it may never get into the breathing zone.