Brecht


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Brecht

Bertolt . 1898--1956, German dramatist, theatrical producer, and poet, who developed a new style of "epic" theatre and a new theory of theatrical alienation, notable also for his wit and compassion. His early works include The Threepenny Opera (1928) and Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1930) (both with music by Kurt Weill). His later plays are concerned with moral and political dilemmas and include Mother Courage and her Children (1941), The Good Woman of Setzuan (1943), and The Caucasian Chalk Circle (1955)
References in periodicals archive ?
He argues convincingly that much further "exegetical close reading" (24) is needed of the many texts left behind by Brecht and published in the Grosse Berliner und Frankfurter Ausgabe of his works.
In a nutshell: Excitingly staged and - as is often the case with the works of Bertolt Brecht - still relevant.
An awful lot of the things that we now accept as part of its language and grammar didn't exist before Brecht," says Peter.
Brecht and Weill wrote the piece between 1927 and 1929.
In a Brecht show, a large proportion of objects--all those produced as "events" according to a "score," which is usually pinned on a nearby wall--can be transformed at will in the manner described in the "Notes on shipping and exhibiting.
For example, in 1935 Brecht suggested that his little daughter Barbara be regaled with "eine kleine Geschichte," specifying "vielleicht die von Joseph in Agypten.
The radio play Das Verhor des Lukullus was quickly written by Brecht and later broadcast by the Swiss-German radio, coincident with Adolf Hitler's invasion of Norway and the Netherlands.
In the Supervisory Board, Michael Brecht succeeds to Stefan Schwaab (born on May 9, 1952), who also holds the position of Deputy Chairman of the Works Council in Gaggenau.
Brecht offered help in developing liaison between the University and relevant parties for adopting this research on commercial scale.
Brecht, Pinter, and the Avant-Garde; three essays on modernist drama.
As scholarship of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century drama turned towards questions of politics in the 1980s and 1990s, many commentators turned to Bertolt Brecht for a theoretical vocabulary to describe a socially engaged theater of the early modern era.