Brecht

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Brecht

Bertolt . 1898--1956, German dramatist, theatrical producer, and poet, who developed a new style of "epic" theatre and a new theory of theatrical alienation, notable also for his wit and compassion. His early works include The Threepenny Opera (1928) and Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1930) (both with music by Kurt Weill). His later plays are concerned with moral and political dilemmas and include Mother Courage and her Children (1941), The Good Woman of Setzuan (1943), and The Caucasian Chalk Circle (1955)
References in periodicals archive ?
Although I would argue that this ending is the film's supreme Brechtian gesture, Demy himself found it unsatisfactory, as did Berthome:
This alters each spectator's inner theatre through Artaudian identifications with the actor's sacrifice and key moments of Brechtian distancing in the various viewpoints the film offers.
Not only, as Bernard Dort points out, was the combustion of the Brechtian fire slow, but in the process, it "changed household," (24) making Barthes's interest in Brecht shift focus.
Because of the need to motivate the masses, plays during the Revolution most often treated present-day events, were realist in style, required few props and simple stage spaces, and employed Brechtian techniques.
Finally, in defining Brechtian theater in terms of what it is not, Calico fails to mention, or realize, that Brecht had not only a Wagnerian tradition to reject, but realist traditions in non-musical theater as well, the Stanislavskian one among them.
Writing on the relationship between Brecht, the theatre and the cinema, Peter Brook argued in 1960 that while, in his view, Brecht is of limited use in theatre, Brechtian aesthetics are of paramount importance to the cinema, especially in relation to new forms of documentary images.
I can't help but feel Greek tragedy is stripped bare by a Brechtian interpretation.
We are shown over twenty devices theorized by the Formalists or exploited by the Russian avant-garde that are without counterparts in Brechtian theatre.
As a cultural outsider, the artist's inquiry into the nature of ritual and repetition has a typically Brechtian character, often with an ironic edge.
The tale of Russian agricultural workers debating the use of land in post World War II Europe, and staging an old tale of a women rescuing a child was perfectly staged in the Brechtian tradition of a minimal setting.
The fascinating staging and complex sound design employ elements of Brechtian alienation and textural deconstruction while the actors perform a gesture-for-gesture impersonation of Burton's on-screen "Hamlet," complete with jerky jump cuts and adjustments for camera angles.
The sets were professional and well-made - a little traditional perhaps, but that's OK, I wouldn't expect Brechtian sparseness in a feel-good musical.