Brer Fox

Brer Fox

sly trickster; outwits everyone. [Children’s Lit.: Uncle Remus]
See: Cunning
References in periodicals archive ?
Another early role saw him dressed as Brer Fox in a production of Brer Rabbit, which also starred a young Benjamin Whitrow who had made his professional debut at the Liverpool Playhouse in 1959.
Wolfe cites the story of how Brer Rabbit made Brer Fox his riding horse as an example of the revenge function the tales serve in vernacular black culture.
Using his wit and wile against his stronger opponents, Brer Wolf and Brer Fox, Brer Rabbit outwitted them most of the time.
This particular tale in which Brer Rabbit outsmarts Brer Fox is representative of the world the old Negro lives in and the boy is about to enter.
When Brer Rabbit outwits and eventually destroys Brer Wolf, Brer Bear, and Brer Fox, his victories are interpreted as supplying at least vicarious pleasure and at most pragmatic advice to black audiences whose position in the world is appreciated as deeply analogous.
Steadroy McDougal - nicknamed Brer Fox - will not be executed, despite being sentenced to death less than two years ago.
In Harris' version, the doll is made by Brer Fox and placed in the roadside to even a score with his archenemy Brer Rabbit.
Most people know the ageless tale by Uncle Remus of Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox and the tar baby.
The first sketch was immediately popular, and Harris continued the tales with "Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and the Tar Baby" ( <IR> see THE TAR BABY </IR> ) in the Constitution on November 16, 1879, dividing the tale into three installments--a technique he often used--to arouse the curiosity of the reader as to Brer Rabbit's ultimate escape.
In spite of repeated assaults by civil rights groups, Uncle Remus remains an icon of American popular culture--as the recent reissue of Walt Disney's 1946 Song of the South makes clear--and the descendants of Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox can be found in the perennial duel between Road Runner and Coyote, as well as in a wide range of Disney cartoon characters.
And Inspector Morse - John Thaw - could also be found at the Williamson Square theatre where he started his career as a 16-year-old, in one case dressed as a Brer Fox in a production of Brer Rabbit which also starred a young Benjamin Whitrow.
Examples of such inter-class competitions include those between the slave John and "Massa," as well as those between Anansi the spider and Brother Anteater, or Brer Rabbit and Brer Fox.