Brewster's angle

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Brewster's angle

[¦brü·stərz ¦aŋ·gəl]
(optics)
The angle of incidence of light reflected from a dielectric surface at which the reflectivity for light whose electrical vector is in the plane of incidence becomes zero; given by Brewster's law. Also known as polarizing angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
In creating a directional light filter, MIT physicist Yichen Shen and his team knew that at the interface between any pair of materials, light arriving from one specific angle, known as the Brewster angle, can simply pass through unimpeded --it won't get reflected or bent.
The incidence angle may then be identified as the Brewster angle 6B at the frequency wc.
In electromagnetics, Brewster angle is defined as angle of incidence for which reflection power is zero.
Finally, we expand upon this research by analyzing the Brewster angle effect and critical angle as functions of permittivity and rotation angles.
Fenniche, "Mirror effect at the Brewster angle in semiconductor rectangular gratings," Phys.
In the second case, the angle of reflection is a Brewster angle and the perpendicular polarization coefficient is only calculated because the parallel one is automatically equal to zero.
The idea is to replace the fixed polarizer with reflected light near the Brewster angle of water (a 53 [degrees] angle of incidence).
Near the Brewster angle of the sea surface, the multipath of VV is greatly attenuated; leading to HH cross-sections are greater than VV.
For the parallel field component, a Brewster angle exists where the power transmission is almost unity for a low loss dielectric material.
But instead of a single diagonal mirror set at 45|degrees~ within the light path, it uses two flats inclined by a particular amount, called the Brewster angle, that causes the reflected light to be highly polarized.
The shift and disappearance of Brewster angle in angular reflectance spectrum and its correlation with depolarization are explained through modeling.