Brine


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brine

1. the sea or its water
2. Chem
a. a concentrated solution of sodium chloride in water
b. any solution of a salt in water

Brine

 

(1) Highly mineralized natural waters in lagoons, salt lakes, reservoirs, and subterranean waters.

(2) Aqueous sodium chloride solutions used in food preserving.

(3) Aqueous solutions of various salts, for example, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride, that have low freezing points. These solutions act as cold conductors between refrigerators and objects being chilled.

(4) Mixtures composed of two or more solid (or solid and liquid) substances that bring about a decrease in temperature when mixed; this decrease is the result of heat absorption upon melting or dissolving.


Brine

 

the water in lagoons, salt lakes, and reservoirs that is in the form of a saturated solution. The brine found in lakes is grouped according to its chemical composition into carbonate brine, sulfate brine, and chloride brine. The concentration and composition of brines vary, depending on the hydrometeorological conditions during different seasons of the year and over the course of many years. Different chemical processes are constantly taking place in brine and result in a change in its salt composition. Brine is used for baths at pelotherapy resorts either as an independent treatment or together with pelotherapy.

brine

[brīn]
(materials)
A liquid used in a refrigeration system, usually an aqueous solution of calcium chloride or sodium chloride, which is cooled by contact with the evaporator surface and then goes to the space to be refrigerated.
(oceanography)
Sea water containing a higher concentration of dissolved salt than that of the ordinary ocean.

brine

In a refrigeration system, any liquid used as a heat transfer medium which remains as a liquid and which has either a flashpoint above 150°F (66°C) or no flashpoint; usually a water solution of inorganic salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experiments were deployed in siliciclastic and carbonate environments along a shelf-to-slope gradient and in brine and hydrocarbon seep environments (Parsons-Hubbard et al.
Brine, who later resigned from the school in Winchfield Drive, Harborne, Birmingham, was given a two-year reprimand, which does not prevent him from working in another school.
The baths were believed to cure rheumatism, with the warm brine improving circulation.
Place chops in a 2-gallon zip-lock plastic bag and add brine.
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The pump and brine solution is supplied on the outside of the machine, which can be completely dissembled with ease, and a combination of coarse filtering allows for efficient cleaning of the system that will meet the highest standards of cleaning inspections.
Such abundant brine resources ripple out into Magnolia and El Dorado, where hundreds of jobs in other sectors depend on providing services to brine workers.
The high-tech filters could extend the life of brine that processors use to quickly chill cured meats from the smokehouse.
Chemical and biological conditions in Petronila Creek, Texas, were dominated for more than 50 years by oil field brine discharges of about 50 times stream salinity.
Brines were encountered in 23 of the 46 samples taken, with another 4 samples being classified as almost brine, and a further 3 samples being brackish water.
As more of our customers are adding liquids to their arsenal of snow fighting tools, we recognized a need for greater flexibility with their brine makers," said Ken Howe, VP Sales Manager.
Tenders are invited for Purchase of Manual Salt Brine System