briquette

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briquette

[bri′ket]
(materials)

briquette, briquet

A molded specimen of mortar with enlarged extremities and reduced center having a cross section of definite area, used for the measurement of tensile strength of mortar.briquette, briquet. A molded specimen of mortar with enlarged extremities and reduced center having a cross section of definite area, used for the measurement of tensile strength of mortar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enviro-Fuels' coke and coal briquettes are formed by mixing the coal or coke fines with the company's proprietary binding agent and feeding the blended mixture into a briquetting machine.
The company has teamed up with Nottingham University, which has found that the calorific value of the briquettes is the same as that of oil burned in power stations.
If more gas makes the car run faster, maybe more gas will make the briquettes burn faster.
Using press briquettes includes fine coal and lignite, peat, sapropel, sawdust, metal shavings, ores and ore concentrates, etc.
As a result of a parallel study using 97% SiC, it became evident that the gradual increase in Si observed with 35% SiC material was not a property of SiC, but rather due to other factors involved with the briquette.
These plants will supply washed coal and smokeless fuel briquettes.
PALLMANN Group is strengthening its position in briquette and pelletising recycling technology with the acquisition of technology from Swiss company BP Recycling Systems GmbH, based in Switzerland.
More flexible than pellet fuel, briquettes can be used in any fire-burning device and typically sell to distributors for between $140 and $200 a ton.
Weima G150 briquette presses are renowned in the industry as robust, reliable, uncomplicated machines demanding low maintenance and delivering high quality briquettes.
The amount of energy that can be obtained from the combustion of wood briquettes was also measured.
The density of biowaste briquettes depends on the density of the original biowaste, the briquetting pressure and, to a certain extent, on the briquetting temperature and time.
In the recent time, owing to obvious limitations in the availability of fossil fuel, research work has shifted from conventional processing of coal, biomass, and fuel wood to more convenient environmentally green solid fuel known as briquettes.