bristlecone pine

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bristlecone pine,

common name for the pinepine,
common name for members of the Pinaceae, a family of resinous woody trees with needlelike, usually evergreen leaves. The Pinaceae reproduce by means of cones (see cone) rather than flowers and many have winged seeds, suitable for wind distribution.
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 species Pinus longaeva, found in the White Mountains of California. Specimens have been known to live some 5,000 years.

bristlecone pine

[‚bris·əl‚kōn ′pīn]
(botany)
A small slow-growing evergreen tree of the genus Pinus that grows at high altitudes in the western United States, having dense branches with rust-brown bark and short needles in bunches of five and thorn-tipped cone scales. The two types are P. longaeva, which lives longer than any other tree (over 4000 years), and P. monophylla, the single-leaf pinyon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Literally nothing is older than a bristlecone pine tree: The oldest and longest-living species on the planet, these pine trees normally are found clinging to bare rocky landscapes of alpine or near-alpine mountain slopes.
Great Basin bristlecone pines are not the only trees that count their rings by the thousands.
5 d Severe narrow rings in Swedish pines 522 536 542 e Frost rings in Bristlecone pines 522 536 541 Reference a 567.
Forest Service scientist Anna Schoettle, is trying to assess diversity of bristlecone pines and to identify, for collection, germplasm that represents what is in the wild.
Dead wood from bristlecone pines may remain in good condition for thousands of years, but this appears to be due largely to the arid conditions of the high deserts in which the trees grow and die, says Larson.
Continue climbing toward the limestone face of Mummy Mountain for another mile and a half until you reach the turnoff to Mummy Springs, marked by a huge bristlecone pine estimated to be 3,000 years old.
This date supports previous work on a tree ring sequence from bristlecone pines in California, which indicated the same date.
ANNUAL ATTENDANCE 90,000 WHY IT'S AWESOME California's Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks have giant trees, but this park has ancient ones--like 4,000-year-old Great Basin bristlecone pines.
And let's not forget how the study of the tree rings of ancient bristlecone pines like Prometheus has enriched our knowledge of the history of fire, climate, and wooden artifacts.
The North American continent boasts thousands of species of trees, everything from the ancient bristlecone pines to towering sequoias.
symposium on tree analysis, they reported the preliminary results of a study of more than 500 bristlecone pines spread over North America.