Brythonic

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Brythonic

(brĭthŏn`ĭk), group of languages belonging to the Celtic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. See Celtic languagesCeltic languages,
subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. At one time, during the Hellenistic period, Celtic speech extended all the way from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula in the west across Europe to Asia Minor in the east, where a district still known as
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Brythonic

01. the S group of Celtic languages, consisting of Welsh, Cornish, and Breton
References in periodicals archive ?
Themes of national defence and cultural integrity align Boudicca's campaign against the Romans with Elizabeth's resistance against the Spanish at Tilbury, for example, and the Tudors' own preference was to trace their historical lineage to Brute and Trojan origins, highlighting a Brittonic heritage (MacDougall 7).
Beginning in earnest in the decades following the Spanish Armada, Boudicca's military campaign against the Romans in 60/1 CE was often feted as confirmation of a proud Brittonic heritage and of resistance to foreign incursion, as in Heywood's description of
The purpose of The Celtic inscriptions of Britain is to bring the historical phonology of Brittonic (embracing Welsh, Cornish and Breton) and of Irish to bear on dating the early Christian inscriptions of Britain south of the Forth-Clyde line, and also those of Brittany.
For some names, it is difficult if not impossible to decide whether they are Brittonic or Irish--or, indeed, Irish affected by the spelling conventions of British Latin.
At times, clearly drawn geographic lines blur in a manner that underscores the fundamental unity of Brittonic Celts.
The languages spoken in sub-Roman Britain were British Latin in the British Lowlands, Brittonic in the Uplands, Wales and Cornwall, and Pictish north of the Clyde--Firth of Forth line.
Although they have been described as the stories of the old Brittonic gods from whom the leading Welsh dynasties claimed descent, Tolstoy, a distant cousin of the famous author Leo Tolstoy, writes how contradictory passages reflect details of historical events in Britain and Ireland during the first two decades of the 11th century.
In this paper I will use the term Goidelic for the Irish/Scottish Gaelic branch of Celtic (Q-Celtic), and Brittonic for the British group including Welsh, Pictish and Cumbric (P-Celtic).
The relevance of the rivers Don is that as Forster himself later points out (1924: 19-20), the name would have been borrowed from Brittonic as [Donu.
The point has been made that the Brittonic and Gael people, the Celts of the British Isles, had lost, or discarded, the name Celt by the early Medieval period, and its current use is a reinvention.
Prof Henry Lewis has recently pointed out that the Welsh or Brittonic form of Illtud's name is undoubtedly 'Elltud' and the corresponding Irish form would be 'Iltuath'.
CORNISH Cornish is an Indo-European language, belonging to the same Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages as Welsh and Breton.