Brythonic

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Brythonic

(brĭthŏn`ĭk), group of languages belonging to the Celtic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. See Celtic languagesCeltic languages,
subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. At one time, during the Hellenistic period, Celtic speech extended all the way from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula in the west across Europe to Asia Minor in the east, where a district still known as
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.

Brythonic

01. the S group of Celtic languages, consisting of Welsh, Cornish, and Breton
References in periodicals archive ?
Themes of national defence and cultural integrity align Boudicca's campaign against the Romans with Elizabeth's resistance against the Spanish at Tilbury, for example, and the Tudors' own preference was to trace their historical lineage to Brute and Trojan origins, highlighting a Brittonic heritage (MacDougall 7).
At times, clearly drawn geographic lines blur in a manner that underscores the fundamental unity of Brittonic Celts.
among other things) the people of Britain who spoke Brittonic - a Celtic language used throughout Britain which later developed into Welsh, Cornish, Breton and other languages.
Jackson stated that the name Telleyr 'is not recognisable, but Anguen with its gu must be a Brittonic name, and probably comes from a Brittonic written document, since if the source was oral Anuen would probably appear.
A short side remark: it is interesting to note that the name of Caedmon is an Anglicization by oral loan of a Brittonic hero's or warrior's name, evidenced among the British princes in the seventh century.
295-6; 'A Brittonic Etymology for luche "throw" in Patience 230', SELIM, iii (1993), 150-3; 'Celtic Etymologies for Middle English brag "boast", gird "strike", and lethe "soften'", Journal of Celtic Linguistics, iii (1994), 135-48: 'A Celtic Etymology for glaverez "deceives" at Pearl 688', N&Q, ccxl (1995), 160-2.
Jackson considered the evidence of Cornish lesic 'bushy' possible, but not wholly convincing, while he described Watson's Brittonic cognate of lobh- 'rot' as 'pure hypothesis'.
The relevance of the rivers Don is that as Forster himself later points out (1924: 19-20), the name would have been borrowed from Brittonic as [Donu.
3) So there is varied testimony for early Brittonic forms with the sense 'slaver' that resemble English glaver.
He was even unhappy in calling the English British, since their language was not derived from the Brittonic.
Its Brittonic cognates (if any) and etymology are unknown.
Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, where the word astel, presumably from the same Brittonic word, is recorded s.