ligament

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Related to Broad ligament: uterine artery, ovarian artery, Round ligament, uterosacral ligament, suspensory ligament of ovary, cardinal ligament, Ovarian ligament

ligament

(lĭg`əmənt), strong band of white fibrous connective tissueconnective tissue,
supportive tissue widely distributed in the body, characterized by large amounts of intercellular substance and relatively few cells. The intercellular material, or matrix, is produced by the cells and gives the tissue its particular character.
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 that joins bones to other bones or to cartilage in the joint areas. The bundles of collagenous fibers that form ligaments tend to be pliable but not elastic. They therefore permit freedom of movement within a certain limited range while holding the attached bones firmly in place. For example, the ligaments at the knee limit the movement of the lower leg to a certain range. Other types of ligaments form fibrous sheets that support such internal organs as the kidneys and the spleen.

Ligament

A strong, flexible connective tissue band usually found between two bony prominences. Most ligaments are composed of dense fibrous tissue formed by parallel bundles of collagen fibers. They have a shining white appearance and are pliable, strong, and noncompliant. A second kind of ligament, composed either partly or almost entirely of yellow elastic fibers, is extensible or compliant, thereby allowing the connected bones to move apart. See Connective tissue, Joint (anatomy)

Ligament

 

in man, a dense band or layer of fibrous tissue that connects skeletal bones or individual organs. Ligaments usually are found near joints and perform a variety of functions, depending on the movements in the joint. Joint capsules are strengthened by reinforcing ligaments, limited in their amplitude by inhibiting ligaments, and directed in their movements by directing ligaments. In many joints, ligaments act as passive bands whose attenuation impairs static functions and alters the shape of the corresponding elements of the skeleton. The main blood vessels that nourish bone pass through some ligaments. The microscopic structure of articular ligaments consists of a variety of dense fibrous tissue whose dominant elements are bands of collagenous and elastic fibers.

The term “ligament” is often applied to anatomic formations not associated with joints, for example, the ligaments of visceral organs, which consist of fine double layers of peritoneum.

ligament

[′lig·ə·mənt]
(engineering)
The section of solid material in a tube sheet or shell between adjacent holes.
(histology)
A flexible, dense white fibrous connective tissue joining, and sometimes encapsulating, the articular surfaces of bones.

ligament

Anatomy any one of the bands or sheets of tough fibrous connective tissue that restrict movement in joints, connect various bones or cartilages, support muscles, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike laparoscopic ligation of ovarian varicosities, laparoscopic ligation of broad ligament varicosities is uncommonly reported in the medical literature," said Dr.
Incise the posterior broad ligament laterally next to the round ligament over the psoas muscle, using endoscopic scissors.
The posterior leaf of the broad ligament is then scored along the side of the uterus.
Robert Brenner of Baltimore points out that when debulking a large uterus at the time of vaginal hysterectomy, after going up as high as possible on the broad ligament, make a subserosal circumferential incision around the entire uterus.
Scoccia opened the broad ligament, identified the uterine vessels, and placed a 5-mm nonabsorbable polyester suture lateral to the uterine vessel.
C) the least common form, or female type, is characterized by bilateral cryptorchidism with testis embedded in the broad ligaments in an ovarian position with respect to the uterus, which is fixed in the pelvis (7).
A vessel-sealing device of your choice can then be used to cross-clamp, seal, and transect the utero-ovarian, round, and broad ligaments.