Broad-Billed Sandpiper


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Broad-Billed Sandpiper

 

(Limicola falcinellus), a bird of the suborder Limicolae.

The body of the broad-billed sandpiper is about 16 cm long; it weighs about 50 g. The bill is somewhat flattened. The back is blackish. The feathers have ochre margins. The throat and side of the body are grayish and mottled brown. The breast and belly are white. Broad-billed sandpipers are found in the tundra zones of Europe and Asia; they winter along the seacoasts of northern Africa, southern Asia, and Australia. They nest in the second half of June in marshy areas. The clutch contains four eggs. The birds feed on small invertebrates.

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Dubai: This year's migratory season is right on track as it welcomes a new bird in town -- the Siberian broad-billed sandpiper.
On Sunday, officials at Dubai Municipality recorded the broad-billed sandpiper at the Ras Al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary for the first time, "which was quite unusual as they have one of the longest distance for migration", said Dr Reza Khan, Specialist, Wildlife and Zoo Management, Public Parks and Horticulture Department at Dubai Municipality.
Across the Dee Estuary, a broad-billed sandpiper was a great find among an impressive flocK of 10,000 dunlins at HoylaKe and Meols, a Russian wader that is rare on western coasts and even rarer in spring.
You can't just pop up to the Lickeys to sort out your dunlin from the rather more exotic broad-billed sandpiper.
A broad-billed sandpiper took up temporary residence on a Devon estuary - a long way west of its main migration route from Asia to Siberia.
A number of threatened species such as the Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius) and Greater Spotted Eagle (Aquila clanga) are seen in the area; more than 3,000 Greater Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) have been counted, and more than 1 per cent of the regional population of Broad-billed Sandpipers (Limicola falcinellus) migrate through in autumn and spring.
A number of globally threatened species such as the Sociable Lapwing Vanellus gregarius and Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga are seen in the area; more than 3,000 Greater Flamingoes Phoenicopterus ruber have been counted, and more than 1% of the regional population of Broad-billed Sandpipers Limicola falcinellus migrate through in autumn and spring.