broadcast

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broadcast

[′brȯd‚kast]
(communications)
A television, radio, or data transmission intended for public reception.

broadcast

A transmission of information relating to air navigation that is not addressed to a specific station or stations (ICAO). No acknowledgment is expected from the recipient of such broadcasts. See also blind transmission.

broadcast

A transmission to multiple, unspecified recipients. On Ethernet, a broadcast packet is a special type of multicast packet which all nodes on the network are always willing to receive.

broadcast

(1) To transmit to every receiver within a geographic area. Over-the-air TV and AM and FM radio are examples of broadcast networks. Contrast with narrowcast.

(2) To transmit to every node on a local network or subnetwork. Broadcasts are commonly used to announce that network resources are now turned on and available, to advertise services and to make requests for address resolution. See broadcast address, multicast, broadcast traffic, address resolution, ARP, SLP and broadcast domain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fred Upton, who sponsored the legislation, said a review of the FCC's notices of apparent liability against broadcasters, and the transcripts of the shows against which complaints were lodged, persuaded him that Congress needs to take action.
Add to that a 30-minute radio broadcast live on the Linder Farm Network during lunch with a farm broadcaster as MC and you have a winner.
We are honored to partner again with these TV and FM broadcasters and appreciate their ongoing commitment to the building.
This latest FCC vote might now eliminate the restrictions of any one broadcaster from owning more than eight radio stations in larger markets and five in smaller markets.
Broadcasters may also be able to use a loophole in the original deal to push it back themselves.
Analog terrestrial broadcasting has already used up much of the frequency spectrum available and some of it needs to be "moved" elsewhere before broadcasters start digitalizing.
What's less well-known--because the phenomenon is new--is just how much broadcasters have come to profit from democracy.
Moreover, the bill exempts religious broadcasters from requirements concerning proof of educational programming.
2 percent of the programs broadcasters were counting as educational were judged to have little or no educational value.
The broadcasters will pay nothing for the exclusive right to use the public airwaves, even though the FCC itself estimated the value of the digital licenses to be worth $20 billion to $70 billion.
The Remote Video code is available for free in the "Tools" section of the Broadcaster.
Deregulation proponents argue that radio broadcasters need the cost advantages associated with size to compete with TV, newspapers, and other larger media companies, and that the ability to provide a national platform for advertisers was imperative for the industry's survival.

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