broadside

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broadside

1. Nautical the entire side of a vessel, from stem to stern and from waterline to rail
2. a ballad or popular song printed on one side of a sheet of paper and sold by hawkers, esp in 16th-century England

broadside

[′brȯd‚sīd]
(electromagnetism)
Perpendicular to an axis or plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of innumerable poems by such "polite" writers as Robert Burns, Lord Byron, and Thomas Moore (a triumvirate that suggests the inadequacies of a term like "polite") in the existing archives of broadside ballads, as well as the fact that elite educated gentlemen such as Samuel Pepys, James Boswell, and Sir Walter Scott collected these supposedly low forms indicates just a few of the problems in drawing distinctions between these different ballad traditions based solely on socioeconomic or class criteria.
Dangerous Women, and Music in Seventeenth-Century English Broadside Ballads Sarah F.
The present essay surveys a genre of folksong that has spanned the folk-popular continuum perhaps longer than any other in Anglo-American tradition: the broadside ballad.
The use of a stock proverb is a common element in broadside ballads, but rarely does an author top and tail his work so neatly with such an expression.
Thomas also gave the Society a collection of hastily printed broadside ballads that he purchased in bulk from a Boston printer in 1813, making him the first broadside ballad collector in the United States.
In their named tunes or titles, their conventional division into two parts, and in other features of format, style and length, a small number of libels echoed the world of the broadside ballad.
For a discussion of the tune and its sources see Simpson, The British broadside ballad and its music, pp.
Increasingly separated from the nationalism of the border ballad and its romance of origins and from the broadside ballad, the nineteenth-century literary ballad relishes instead its own "stylistic connotation," the generic texture that gives a sense of pastness embodied in and felt as style.
During the earlier decades of the eighteenth century, the term "lyric" could denote a number of poetic types ranging from the "high" purposes of the Pindaric Ode to the "light" verse that was on the one hand the offspring of Cavalier poetry and on the other the broadside ballad.
The text of "Pretty Polly" can be traced to two English sources, Child ballad #4, "Lady Isabel and the Elfin Knight," and the British broadside ballad "The Gosport Tragedy," which is also known as "The Cruel Ship's Carpenter.
The charity event also features Malc Gurnham, Terry St Clair, Broadside ballad performer John Foreman and harmony trio Burdett, Simpson and Young.
good-night Sensational type of broadside ballad , popular in England from the 16th through the 19th century, purporting to be the farewell statement of a criminal made shortly before his execution.