Broca's area


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Related to Broca's area: Wernicke's area, Broca's aphasia

Broca's area

[′brō·kəz ‚er·ē·ə]
(neuroscience)
In the human brain, an area in the inferior left frontal lobe — one of several areas believed to activate the fibers of the precentral gyrus concerned with movements necessary for speech production; injury to this area generally results in nonfluent aphasia, with effortful articulation, loss of syntax, but relatively well-preserved auditory comprehension.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, Flinker and fellow researchers have found that Broca's area -- which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye -- engages with the brain's temporal cortex, which organizes sensory input, and later the motor cortex, as we process language and plan which sounds and movements of the mouth to use, and in what order.
Forebrain expansion is evident, including prefrontal cortex, and a plausible claim can be made that a Broca's area is present in early Homo.
During the performance of relatively easy tasks, the degree of activation required in Broca's area decreases, while fluent speech is produced (Sandak & Fiez, 2000:448).
Broca's aphasia is the most common of the non-fluent type, thus named because it corresponds to a lesion in Broca's area of the brain.
Broca's area has long been associated with speech functions, but it is the first time specific parts have been identified.
Wernicke illustrated that Broca's area is located in the internal portion of the left frontal lobe.
Broca's area is the part responsible for forming speech.
18,23] The prefrontal region lies anterior to the motor area, located just anterior to the central fissure, while Broca's area is situated at the inferior frontal gyrus.
Among subjects who learned their second language in early adulthood, however, the patterns of activity associated with the two languages were spatially separated in Broca's area.
TEHRAN (FNA)- For 150 years, the iconic Broca's area of the brain has been recognized as the command center for human speech, including vocalization.
After all the experiments, out of the nine regions they analyzed - four in the left frontal lobe, including the region known as Broca's area, and five further back in the left hemisphere - eight uniquely supported language, showing no significant activation for any of the seven other tasks.