Brodmann's areas

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Brodmann's areas

[′bräd·mənz ‚er·ē·əz]
(physiology)
Numbered regions of the cerebral cortex used to identify cortical functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Language and visual perception associations: Meta-analytic connectivity modeling of Brodmann area 37.
This component shows activation also in Brodmann area 5, not previously found.
7 (36, -24, 27) Precentral gyrus Declive Notes: IC = independent component; BA = Brodmann area.
Furthermore, in the workers studied, there was the possibility that afferences with the pre-central area--specifically Brodmann area 8, responsible for coordination of ocular movement- were involved (Roman Lapuente, 2010).
Compared with sham acupuncture, acupuncture at Waiguan in stroke patients inhibited Brodmann area 5 on the healthy side.
041 -44 28 21 Gyrus Notes: p (FWE-cor) = p value with Family Wise Error correction; BA = Brodmann area.
In Brodmann area 8 there are nerve centers (part of the oculocephalogyric area) that control combined eye and head movements; so, the nerve center of the right hemisphere produce simultaneous head and eyes left turns and vice versa.
Visual area V2, also called Brodmann area 18 in the cerebrum, receives strong projections from the primary visual cortex (V1), transfers output connections to higher loci, such as V3, V4, and V5, and also sends feedback to V1 (Gazzaniga et al.
The brain region that such voxel/coordinates fall into is indicated a Brodmann area number, as is normally done in fMRI reports (Brodmann 1909).
In the present study, we determined the fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, Brodmann area 10) of patients with bipolar disorder (n=18) and age-matched normal controls (n=19) by gas chromatography.
Lindstrom says a region known as Brodmann Area 10, for example, is active when we think something is cool or hip; the right mesial prefrontal cortex is tied to the tendency to collect things; the nucleus accumbens, known as "the craving spot," plays a role in addiction and reward; and the amygdale handles responses to fear.
Imaging studies led researchers to an area of the brain thought to be involved in depression called Brodmann Area 25, which appears to become overactive when people are profoundly sad and depressed.