dead link

(redirected from Broken Link)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

dead link

A hyperlink on a website that points to a Web page that has been deleted or moved. Also called an "orphan link," it may also be a temporary condition if the Web server is down. Contrast with live link. See 404 error and link rot.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Then the clanging of a chain, and a noise as of the snapping back against stone of a broken link.
A similar yearning to renew the broken links of brotherhood with his kind sometimes showed itself in a milder form; and once it was made beautiful by the religion that lay even deeper than itself.
However, this approach doesn't catch every broken link, and end-users don't have a clear protocol for identifying and remediating these problems themselves, so they burden their IT departments with help requests.
A single broken link can impact search engine ratings, diminish a site's user experience, cause lost customers and revenue, or all of the above.
With this broken link, a next-day entitled customer may receive a spare part from a location reserved for customers paying for same-day premium service.
By fixing this broken link in the value chain, Ontela unlocks revenues for carriers and mobile imaging companies alike.
New features include Restart-able Full Refresh, which enables existing migrations to re-start from the point of broken network connection and provides storage administrators considerable time savings, especially if a broken link condition occurs near the middle or end of a large data migration.
Last time we did this exercise was in 2012, and we found a broken link rate of 2.
The Restartable Full Refresh feature provides storage administrators considerable time savings, especially if a broken link condition occurs near the middle or end of a large data migration.
The complete solution covers all aspects of SEO including server configuration, broken link notifications, improved crawling and granular keyword recommendations.
The "2005 Broken Link Study" findings indicate that, although technologies have changed drastically over this period of time, the prevalence of broken messages has remained at nearly the same level as in the previous study, albeit for different--and sometimes surprising--reasons.
The home page contains faulty examples of every method that an HTML page can use to link to another, with 74 bad links on this page and one further broken link that might be detected if the tool does not obey the directives in robots.