Bronzino


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Bronzino

Il, real name Agnolo di Cosimo. 1503--72, Florentine mannerist painter
References in classic literature ?
He was seen at once rummaging with ardor in an old box, in which he found some brushes, a little gnawed by the rats, but still passable; some colors in bladders almost dried up; some linseed-oil in a bottle, and a palette which had formerly belonged to Bronzino, that dieu de la pittoure, as the ultramontane artist, in his ever young enthusiasm, always called him.
The author says of a Franciabigio portrait that its "sculptural smoothness looks directly forward to Bronzino and Allori portraits," when the accompanying illustration clearly shows loose brushwork (166).
Even before Davids successful treatment, Italian conservators had quietly conducted another, equally extensive and delicate project: the restoration of 22 of the museum's major 16th-century Florentine altar paintings, among them splendid, idiosyncratic masterpieces by Alessandro Allori and Agnolo Bronzino, and the little-known Carlo Portelli's greatest work, the bizarrely beautiful Dispute on the Immaculate Conception (Fig.
They got very upset when the Bronzino was moved from its usual place to hang opposite a Parmigianino lent by the National Gallery of London so it created a Mannerist dialogue.
Bronzino and Raphael are some of the other artists included, but most notable is the newly-restored Sacrifice of Isaac by Andrea del Sarto (left).
Pontormo, Bronzino, and Allori: A Genealogy of Florentine Art.
Sienese paintings of the fifteenth century are seemingly a mere repetition of the preceding century, and the feverish images and acid colours of paintings by II Sodoma and Domenico Beccafumi have largely remained in the shadow of Pontormo and Bronzino in popular appeal.
It is not surprising that these three versions of the Madonna and Child with St John the Baptist, among other Bronzino paintings of the late 1520s, have been attributed to Pontormo.
The Petrarchan poetess sits to Agnolo Bronzino for a portrait that was soon the subject of witty sonnet exchanges in their literary circle.
Not by chance, en route from Rome to Venice, Salviati met Bronzino in Florence, and collaborated with him on the triumphal displays for the marriage of Cosimo de'Medici and Eleanora of Toledo, in whose chapel a similar blue is predominant.
Since Bronzino wrote both courtly and burlesque poetry, Parker reasons, the same dualism must hold for his paintings.
In a chapter on theatrical scenery, Pallen proposes an arc from the early work of Girolamo Genga extending through contributions by Baldassarre Peruzzi, Giulio Pippi, called Giulio Romano, Bastiano da San Gallo, called Aristotile, Battista Franco, Bronzino, and Vasari himself.