brood parasitism

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brood parasitism

[¦brüd ‚par·ə·sə‚tiz·əm]
(ecology)
A type of social parasitism among birds characterized by a bird of one species laying and abandoning its eggs in the nest of a bird of another species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indirect estimates of breeding and natal philopatry in an obligate avian brood parasite.
Costs of multiple parasitism for an avian brood parasite, the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater).
The brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), an obligate brood parasite, had previously shown greater resistance to infection with WNV, lower viremia and faster recovery when infected, and lower subsequent antibody titers than the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), a close relative that is not a brood parasite.
Our results show that internal incubation gives cuckoo chicks that crucial head start in life, allowing them to dispose of their nest mates - a superb adaptation to being a brood parasite," said Professor Tim Birkhead, from the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield.
Experts agree that any reduction in forest management, including the planting of tens of thousands of acres each year and the control of brood parasite cowbirds, will result in a quick decline of the species.
The brown-headed cowbird is an obligate brood parasite that lays its eggs into nests of >200 species (Friedmann and Kiff, 1985).
These consistent mount-sex specific behavioral patterns imply that hosts respond to the different sexes of the brood parasite with different defensive strategies.
Community-level patterns of host use by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), a generalist brood parasite.
In addition to being a brood parasite, Brown-headed Cowbirds are considered nest predators, because they remove host eggs and nestlings, often causing nest failure.
An experimental test of preferences for nest contents in an obligate brood parasite, Molothrus ater.
Evidence of recognition and discrimination of parasitic nestlings is relatively rare among hosts of avian brood parasite species (Redondo 1993; Grim et al.