Brownfield

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Brownfield

The designation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for existing facilities or sites that are abandoned, idled, or otherwise underused real property where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination that needs to be cleaned up before the site can be used again. Examples are former dry-cleaning establishments and gas stations. The use of brownfields typically reduces land cost by using land that is less desirable. However, lower land costs must be balanced against the cost of any required remediation and possible health risks to residents. The EPA sponsors an initiative to help mitigate these health risks and return the facility or land to renewed use. Many green guidelines and standards provide points for building in brownfield areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brownfields revolving loan funds provide funding for loans and grants to carry out cleanup activities at brownfield sites.
This can happen whether the redevelopment costs are high or low, because the market traps brownfields in an information vacuum.
Brownfields are vacant or underutilized properties that remain undeveloped because of complications caused by environmental contamination.
2005) used pairwise comparisons of hypothetical brownfields with different policy mixes to explore the differences between those developers with experience in brownfields and those with none to determine which policies are attractive as incentives to promote redevelopment.
Murray, along with a number of local and state officials, marked the 10-year anniversary of the state's brownfields legislation yesterday morning by reviewing environmental and economic successes of the past decade and rededicating themselves to the revitalization of contaminated sites across the state.
EPA) Brownfields program, including its work with local health departments and the opportunities to link these collaborations with U.
Brownfields are sites where expansion, redevelopment or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant or contaminant.
Even in these relatively early days, brownfields remediation and reuse is almost universally viewed as a done deal--a major environmental success story.
Kaiser remarked that although the word "demolition" does not appear in the federal 2002 Brownfields Act, demolition is "considered to be an intrinsic part of and inseparable from clean-up" in the brownfields sector.
Brownfields or lands occupied in or around existing mines stand a better chance of revealing new economic deposits, since there are already proven quality ore reserves in the vicinity, says Laurentian University's Mineral Exploration Research Centre director Harold Gibson.