Brunelleschi


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Brunelleschi

Filippo . 1377--1446, Italian architect, whose works in Florence include the dome of the cathedral, the Pazzi chapel of Santa Croce, and the church of San Lorenzo
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Despite that, it's still an enjoyable read for what it tells of Brunelleschi and life in Florence in the 15th century.
Dopo gli exploits di Brunelleschi la figura dell'artista non poteva piu essere confusa con quella dell'artigiano; la cupola di S.
BrunCon, a premier urban developer of adaptive re-use properties in Hudson County, was established based on the principals of their Renaissance namesake, Filippo Brunelleschi.
Filippo Brunelleschi started in 1420 with the construction of the Cupola, the most characteristic feature of the Florentine skyline.
In the era of Brunelleschi, no one doubted this potential.
Though Brunelleschi was no facade architect, despite his original contribution to the debate of the times, his involvement in literary groups engaged in discussions on literature and art (such as the Burchiello group, which comprised also a great Dante scholar, Giovanni da Prato) made him a point of reference to all Florence.
The use of one point linear perspective comes from the perspective theory of Brunelleschi (Hartt 1994).
Leonardo Da Vinci was familiar with the camera obscura; in the 15th century, the architect Filipo Brunelleschi pioneered vanishing-point perspective, while Jan van Eyck clearly understood mirrors and lenses and almost certainly used them.
Eventually she would cull a vast Spanish repertoire from many sources, but first she went home to teach, perform, and stage for two decades the dances she had learned with Brunelleschi in London, Emma Maleras in Barcelona, La Quica in Madrid, and Realito in Seville.
It looks like an industrial eyesore but experts say it bears the hallmarks of 15th century architect Filippo Brunelleschi, famous for his designs of the Florence domes.
In "The History of Perspective" Schrott speaks with the voice of Florentine architects like Brunelleschi and Michelangelo.