Budakalász

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Budakalász

 

a burial ground belonging to the Baden, or Pecel, culture that was discovered near Budapest in 1952. More than 550 graves were uncovered. Burying predominated, although cremation is also evident; cenotaphs were found as well. The unearthed objects include tureens divided into two parts, small pitchers, canoe-shaped stone axes, copper awls, beads, and shells of the genus Dentalium. A unique find was a rectangular vessel that had four wheels instead of the usual four legs; this is the oldest evidence of the existence of carriages in Central Europe. The burial ground dates from the third millennium B.C.

REFERENCE

Banner, J. “Die Péceler Kultur.” In the collection Archaeologia Hungarica, series nova, vol. 35. Budapest, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
Public service contract transferring regular collection, removal and disposal of the resulting administrative area of the city Budakalasz MSW (municipal) waste for a period of 12 months and can be extended four times in 12 months in options.
1: 9) or between Budakalasz and Kosewo (Figs 1: 12; 8).
The same may not however be true for the Budakalasz fibula, the only specimen of the II D class known so far from the Carpathian Basin.
According to the recently published radiocarbon dates from Budakalasz in Hungary (Siklosi 2009), the representations of the Classical Baden wagon-shaped cups from this graveyard and the similar objects from Szigetszentmarton belong in this last timeframe.
Absolute and internal chronology of the Late Copper Age cemetery at Budakalasz, in M.
The NAVTEQ map of Hungary provides detailed road network coverage for greater Budapest -- the country's largest urban center -- including the city proper as well as the suburban municipalities of Budakalasz, Budakeszi Budaors, Csomor, Diosd, Dunaharaszti, Dunakeszi, Ecser, Erd, Fot, Gyal, Halasztelek, Kerepes, Kistarcsa, Nagykovacsi, Pecel, Pilisborosjeno, Solymar, Szigethalom, Szigetszentmiklos, Torokbalint and Urom.
Waste collection and pre-processing tasks, as well as administrative tasks related to the supply and operation of the Budakalasz junkyard.
a The oldest vehicles seem to have been four-wheeled wagons (Uruk-Eanna IVa and Bronocice III; wagon-shaped cups of the Hungarian classical Baden culture at Budakalasz and Szigetszentmarton, Piggott 1983: figures 14-15, and from Baden context in Croatia, see below; the North Pontic steppes: Littauer & Crouwel 1996: 936; Single Grave culture of northwestern Germany, 3rd millennium BC).
c Unlike sledges, which usually were pulled by traces (pace Littauer & Crouwel 1979: 14), the traction of wagons and carts was effected by pole and yoke (Bronocice III; Lohne-Engelshecke; Single Grave culture in northwestern Germany; the loop-handles of the wagon cups of Budakalasz, broken off, and Szigetszentmarton may represent metaphorical draught-poles).
For example, a clay model was found at the Budakalasz cemetery where a cattle skeleton was also excavated.
Additionally, the handle ornament from Kreznica Jara (Gajewski 1953: 37, table 37); the signs on bowls from Bronocice (Milisauskas & Kruk 1982; 1991) and Ostrowca Swietokrzysko (Uzarowiczowa 1975a), and the clay wagon models from ritual contexts (Makkay 1965: 14) at Budakalasz (Soproni 1954) and Szigetszentmarton (Kalicz 1976: 109, [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4 OMITTED]) imply a mythical or symbolic meaning (Gunther 1990: 59-62).
Waste collection and pre-treatment tasks, as well as providing the associated administrative tasks, and the resulting commercial supplies of the working of Budakalasz junkyard.