Buffon's problem

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Buffon's problem

[bü′fȯnz ‚präb·ləm]
(statistics)
The problem of calculating the probability that a needle of specified length, dropped at random on a plane ruled with a series of straight lines a specified distance apart, will intersect one of the lines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, since Todhunter (1865), Laplace's result was often referred to as the application of Buffon's needle problem to the estimation of % (in school mathematics, it is usually the only "application" of the needle problem until today).
Gabriel Lame (1795-1870) included Buffon's needle problem and its generalizations to a circle, an ellipse and regular polygons in his lectures held at the Sorbonne.
Among other results, he returned to the problem of a generalized Buffon's needle consisting of two rigidly connected convex figures of diameters less than the distance of parallels solved by Crofton (1868), and he gave its solution based on Barbier's expectation approach.
Hostinsky (1917; 1920) criticized the traditional solution of Buffon's needle problem for being based on an unrealistic assumption that parallels were drawn on an unbounded board and the probability that the needle midpoint hit a region of a given area was proportional to this area and independent of the position of the region.
Using online simulations for Buffon's Needle and the Monte Carlo method (e.
But its similarity with the famous Buffon's needle experiment [2] makes it interesting to compare the estimation of obtained by simulating the two experiments.
A frame work in which we can compare simulation experiments for Buffon's needle experiment, which will be described below, and our golf ball experiments will be set up.
html [an online discussion and simulation of Buffon's Needle experiment]
The coin-and-chessboard problem is easier to solve than Buffon's needle problem but the two have a common feature.