Bullwinkle

Bullwinkle

dimwitted moose with penchant for pedantry. [TV: “Rocky and His Friends” in Terrace, II, 252–253]
References in periodicals archive ?
Legendary voiceover artist June Foray, who has provided voiceover work for hundreds of characters - including "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show's," "Rocky the Flying Squirrel," and Tweety's owner Granny in the early 1960s -died Thursday at the age of 99.
Other animals and kids make Bullwinkle a bit nervous, so he would do best in an adult-only home where he is the only pet.
Oh, and he's the only guru to channel both Elvis and Bullwinkle - and at the same time yet
Original hit songs were used in each episode, but the sometimes dodgy Scouse voices (think a chirpier Thomas the Tank Engine) were not those of the actual band - apparently both John and George were recorded by the same guy responsible for the character Boris Badenov on Rocky and Bullwinkle.
This pair first appeared as a running gag (weekly segments called Peabody's Improbable History) on the late-50s Rocky and Bullwinkle Show, probably the first truly zany cartoon series on American television.
CREDITS: (Animated) A 20th Century Fox release of a DreamWorks Animation presentation of a PDI/ DreamWorks, Bullwinkle Studios production.
Mr Peabody, a talking dog who also happens to be a genius, and Sherman - his adopted son - were originally seen as segments in the Rocky And Bullwinkle TV series.
The original cartoons - part of the Rocky & Bullwinkle series, which barely featured on UK TV - may be lost on Brits but it doesn't matter.
Lassie, The Lone Ranger (licensed to Disney for a live action feature being produced by Jerry Bruckheimer for 2013 release), and George Of The Jungle; Christmas specials Frosty The Snowman, Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer, and Santa Claus Is Comin" To Town; Veggie Tales (via Big Idea Entertainment); Olivia and Noddy, acquired this year from Chorion; comic book archives and media rights to Golden Books; and management of the Jay Ward catalog, including Rocky and Bullwinkle (via joint venture with Jay Ward Productions).
For those of you old enough to remember the cartoon Rocky & Bullwinkle Show, Maguire's writings remind me of the "Fractured Fairytales" that would play during the Rocky & Bullwinkle Show, except Maguire's fairytale escapades are much darker.
Here is a question that came to mind after Alex Anderson, the long-overlooked artist who created Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Bullwinkle J.
In the first issue of Lose, a magical imp gets banished to cartoon hell where Rocky and Bullwinkle get wasted in the massive, purgatorical head of'30s comic strip character Nancy while being forced to watch a constant loop of old images of their younger selves degrading, becoming unrecognizable and distant.