bumblebee

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bumblebee:

see beebee,
name for flying insects of the superfamily Apoidea, in the same order as the ants and the wasps. Bees are characterized by their enlarged hind feet, typically equipped with pollen baskets of stiff hairs for gathering pollen.
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bumblebee

[′bəm·bəl‚bē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for several large, hairy social bees of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae.

bumblebee

, humblebee
any large hairy social bee of the genus Bombus and related genera, of temperate regions: family Apidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Although distributions of bumble bees in the United States have been defined broadly (Franklin, 1913; Mitchell, 1962), most range-wide treatments are dated and rarely contain geographically discrete records of occurrence.
Over the past few years, one bumble bee in particular, the western bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis, has caught his eye.
A FETED Welsh artist yesterday handed out free sketches to highlight the plight of the British bumble bee.
At the same time, queen bumble bees become very active.
So a detailed study into the lifecycle of the bumble bee was commissioned as a starting point to solving the quandary.
In a bid to save the gravity defying insects, the trust has called on gardeners to help them find out how dependent bumble bees are on garden flowers.
One of the most spectacular species is the red-tailed bumble bee.
The image was of a big bumble bee complete with its furry, fat middle and tiny, delicate wings - a welcome change from drawings of nuclear reactors and spaghetti-like circuit diagrams.
The Carder is pretty much brown all over, and the Red-Tailed bumble bee is yellow and black with a red tailend.
Sue began by explaining the differences between honey bees, bumble bees and wasps - discussing the important differences between their stings, swarms and nests.
Other types of bees, such as bumble bees,are also suffering because of the loss of their nesting habitats and modern intensive agriculture.
The resulting colonies were exposed to parasites which commonly infest bumble bees.