Bunsen burner

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Bunsen burner,

gas burner, commonly used in scientific laboratories, consisting essentially of a hollow tube which is fitted vertically around the flame and which has an opening at the base to admit air. A smokeless, nonluminous flame of high temperature is produced. The underlying principle of the Bunsen burner is basic to common gas stoves and lamps.

Bunsen burner

[′bən·sən ′bər·nər]
(engineering)
A type of gas burner with an adjustable air supply.

Bunsen burner

a gas burner, widely used in scientific laboratories, consisting of a metal tube with an adjustable air valve at the base
References in periodicals archive ?
A sample is held in place (E) and combusted in a Bunsen burner or similar flame (D).
In 1860, Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff demonstrated how they could identify useful elements such as iron, copper and lead, or sodium and potassium, in potential ores, by the colors that powdered specimens sprinkled into a Bunsen burner flame produced.
Karen Harrington, 53, a nurse, said: "I liked using the Bunsen burners and doing experiments in chemistry when the test tubes would all froth up.
There's even a nod to the fire pit of the Survivor series when House dons tribal head-dress and lights a series of Bunsen burners to hold his own tribal council.
Last night, Carmarthenshire county councillor John Jenkins, a governor at the Dafen-based school, said he believed the staff were affected by a gas leak in a valve serving bunsen burners in the school laboratory.
When you get the test tubes and bunsen burners out?
There are no men in white suits brandishing Bunsen burners - instead we get bona-fide Irish celebrities.
The judging panel also voted for gravy, chips, sticky toffee pudding, bubblegum, cola and banana chews, Bunsen burners and sweaty PE kits.
Jekyll & Hyde'' has been given a sharp, monochromatic production design by James Noone and director Robin Phillips, including a terrific-looking lab filled with evil green and amber beakers and Bunsen burners.
With Bunsen burners and test tubes at the ready, the quartet of budding scientists impressed judges at Aston University as they completed a two-hour problem-solving challenge.