Burin

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burin

1. a chisel of tempered steel with a sharp lozenge-shaped point, used for engraving furrows in metal, wood, or marble
2. an engraver's individual style
3. Archaeol a prehistoric flint tool with a very small transverse edge

Burin

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A sharp, pointed tool used in Witchcraft and Ceremonial Magic, for marking other magical items. Many Wiccan traditions engrave signs and symbols on the handles and/or blades of their working tools. Similarly, names are inscribed on candles to be used in candle magic. The Burin is used to do this engraving.

The Burin is similar in use to the White Handled Knife, a coven tool for many traditions. But where the White Handled Knife would be used only within the Circle during a ritual, the Burin could be used outside of coven use, since it is a personal tool rather than a coven tool.

Burin

 

(also graver), in archaeology, a flint tool with a cutting edge that was used by man in the Upper Paleolithic and in the Mesolithic and early Neolithic to work bone, antler and certain types of rocks.


Burin

 

a tool used for engraving, consisting of a thin steel bar cut off obliquely at one end and sharpened; the other end is inserted into a wooden, mushroom-shaped handle that is trimmed off on the side. Burins used for engraving metal usually have a rhombic cross section; those used for engraving wood have a variety of cross sections.

burin

[′bər·ən]
(graphic arts)
An etching tool used for engraving on metal or wood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abri Pataud level 7 (France) Contains burins busques and a lozangic point comparable to those found in Britain.
Additionally, true Vachons burin bladelet cores, usually considered markers of the latest Aurignacian (Pesesse & Michel 2006), are present at Spy (Otte 1979).
The presence of two complex methods in British collections--the burin busque and Paviland burin methods--should therefore be viewed as evidence for either two phases of occupation or, alternatively, an occupation sufficiently prolonged to have encompassed the period within which one was replaced by the other (Dinnis 2009).
On the technology of late Aurignacian burin and scraper production, and the importance of the Paviland lithic assemblage and the Paviland burin.
The regional distribution and in particular, the lack of industries with Noailles burins above the River Loire might be used to argue a preliminary model of cultural change.
L'unite technique des industries a burins du Raysse dans leur contexte diachronique.
Un nouveau type d'armature en contexte gravettien et son mode de production sur les burins du Raysse (la Picardie, commune de Preuilly-sur-Claise), Bulletin de la Societe Prehistorique Francaise 99(4): 751-64.
Apropos des burins du Raysse du Flageolet I (Dordogne, France).
As noted above, scrapers as well burins sometimes have burin facets (TABLE 4).
For example, if McBurney had classified a number of objects that were burins as scrapers that might explain the presence of burin facets on some items labelled as scrapers, although it would not explain the other similarities in size, shape and retouch form between the two types.
As noted above, a substantial portion (70%) of burins have one or more rows of short, steep retouch on to the dorsal face [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
Measurements presented earlier have already demonstrated that the form and extent of this burin-like retouch is generally identical to that of the specimens McBurney recognised as burins.