boa constrictor

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boa constrictor

a very large snake, Constrictor constrictor, of tropical America and the Caribbean, that kills its prey by constriction: family Boidae (boas)

boa constrictor

largest of all snakes; squeezes its victims in a deadly grip. [Zoology: NCE, 317]
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the efforts of python hunters, extreme cold weather ranks as the top factor in suppressing the numbers of Burmese python.
Native to Southeast Asia, the Burmese python is one of the deadliest predators in Florida with population estimates varying from the thousands to hundreds of thousands.
Secor got wrapped up in studying Burmese pythons after observing their amazing digestive feats.
Therefore, even though we have provided some simple monetary estimates of the damage a single Burmese python might have on an ecosystem, it is important to realize these values should be treated as a lower boundary for the estimates of ecological damage.
The Burmese python is one of the largest species of snake in the world.
Researchers are just now beginning to investigate the dietary habits of the Burmese python in ENP to help identify the impact of this invasive species on the native fauna (Snow et al.
In addition to collecting local snakes, he has imported the Burmese pythons from a trader in Israel.
With animals from across the length and breadth of the world, the interactive 'Creepy Crawlies' exhibit will offer the opportunity for close encounters for visitors and photo-mementoes with rare species such as the Albino Burmese Python or Iguanas.
We're clearly concerned about the Burmese python invasion," says David Hallac, Everglades' chief of biological resources, "but it's really just a reminder of all the other exotic species we have.
In addition, state environmental officials worry that the rock python could breed with the Burmese python, which already has an established foothold in the Everglades.
The Burmese python is one of the most difficult to get rid of.
As John is obviously not the greatest fan of cats, perhaps to illustrate the above points, he may be interested to know that last week in Bristol a tabby cat, Wilbur, strayed into the next garden only to encounter a 13-foot Burmese python (possibly with a hungry glint in its eye).