Shahr-i Sokhta

(redirected from Burnt city)

Shahr-i Sokhta

 

a multilevel Neolithic and Bronze Age settlement, located 40 km from the city of Zabol, in Iran. Shahr-i Sokhta was excavated by British (1916) and Italian (1967–71) expeditions. Its development has been traced from a settlement of early farmers of the late fourth and early third millennia B.C., characterized by hand-modeled painted pottery, to an urban center of the second half of the third millennium B.C., with developed industry and monumental architecture. By the beginning of the second millennium B.C., Shahr-i Sokhta was no longer inhabited.

REFERENCE

Tosi, M. “Seistan v bronzovom veke—raskopki na Shakhri-Sokhte.” Sovetsakaia arkheologiia, 1971, no. 3.
References in periodicals archive ?
To find out more about the health, hygiene and social conditions of the residents of Burnt City, 10 percent of its huge cemetery will also be excavated.
Burnt City dates from the Bronze Age and is associated with the Jiroft culture.
Talebkhan Hill is one of the suburban villages of Burnt City and influenced by the citys culture," he said.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in a message on Sunday praised the efforts made by the country's Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization (CHHTO) for enrolling the ancient Burnt City in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) list of global heritage.
Tehran, June 22 (ANI): Archeological studies have found that the female inhabitants of Iran's ancient site of Burnt City outlived the male members of their community.
According to Mansur Seyyed Sajjadi, head of the Iranian archeological team working at the site, the excavations at the Burnt City also suggest that the inhabitants were a civilized people who were both farmers and craftsmen.
Tehran, June 8 (ANI): Archeologists have unearthed 65 statues of human and animal figures in Burnt City, located in Iran's southeastern province of Sistan and Balouchestan.
Rome's National Museum of Oriental Art is planning to mount an art exhibition of a collection of the relics unearthed in Iran's Burnt City.
Tehran, March 2 (ANI): Archaeologists have identified a 5000-years-old pottery kiln near the ancient Burnt City of in Shahr-e Sukhteh in Sistan-va-Baluchestan Province in Iran.
With numerous discoveries already made and more in the making, the Burnt City of Iran remains one of the richest Bronze Age archeological sites of the Middle East, dating back more than 5000 years.
Women lived twice as long as men in Iran's oldest community, the Burnt City of Sistan, according to archaeological studies reported by the government's Cultural Heritage News (CHN).
Recent studies conducted by a team of archeologists suggest that 5,000 years ago women had economic control over Iran's Burnt City.