Burka

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Burka

 

a sleeveless felt cloak common in the Caucasus. There are two types: the rider’s burka, which is long, thickpiled, and has seams that form broad shoulders; and the burka worn by those who travel by foot, which is short, smooth, and seamless—a necessary part of the equipment of Caucasian herdsmen.

References in periodicals archive ?
The issue of the burqa is not a religious issue, it is a question of freedom and of women's dignity," he said.
Controversy: Muslim women happy to wear burqas in Sparkhill, Birmingham.
He told at a news conference the assailants used burqas to show they were going to attend a party.
Dubai Minority Muslims were up in arms against a college in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh which refused to allow students wearing the burqa (veil) to take a competitive examination yesterday.
If we assume that French President Nicolas Sarkozy is genuinely motivated by the belief that burqas are a "sign of subservience, a sign of debasement," according to the 16 January edition of The Economist, his best response would in fact be to enact measures welcoming Muslim citizens more fully into French society.
Al Jazeera's James Bays, reporting from the capital Kabul, said the attackers were "using a tactic we have seen a number of times recently, including during an attack in Gardez a couple of days ago - that's attackers - male attackers - wearing female burqas to cover themselves and to cover the bombs they have strapped to their bodies.
So, sure, everyone should be able to make their own personal choices about religion, but that is as much the point of a ban on burqas.
However, the high turnout of women wearing burqas was a surprise, especially since it is commonly understood that they do not leave the home except for "urgent" matters.
Mr Straw did not say Muslim women should not wear veils or burqas covering their face.
The little Protestant church had been filled, mainly with women and girls, when two attackers clad in burqas - the all-encompassing garment worn by women in some Islamic countries - burst in.
In a recent Washington Post story, William Fulton, president of the Solimar Research Group in Ventura, described Valley secessionists as being ``on a jihad to create a new city,'' conjuring up images of bearded militants strapping bombs to themselves along Ventura Boulevard, pulling Valley girls from the malls and forcing them to don burqas.