business process

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business process

An action taken in the course of conducting business. Whether manual or automated, all processes require input and generate output. Depending on the level of viewing and modeling, a process can be a single task or a complicated procedure such as building a product.

A business information system process typically means updating a database from a transaction such as an order or application form (transaction vs. master). See transaction, business process modeling, business processing and information system.
References in periodicals archive ?
controversy over the patentability of business methods arise at this
products are software, business methods, and diagnostic tests.
258) These same commentators likewise stress that Section 14 of the AIA cannot be "construed to imply that other business methods are patentable or valid.
She concludes that business methods probably fall in this category.
Financial services firms realized the potential competitive value of patents on their business methods and software.
Nonpatent-prior art in the area of business methods may include programmed e-commerce website applications, literature and websites suggesti ng specific sales techniques for the Web, and possibly the entire field of business practices (nonsoftware implemented).
237) If one can say that at least some business methods and their electronic applications are sufficiently inventive, then there is no rational reason to exclude business methods as per se unpatentable.
With business methods, the time frame between conception and practice should be short.
The source said the ministers are likely to call for internationally coordinated standards for patenting business methods, as differences in relevant criteria in each nation make it difficult for corporations to engage in global operations.
That's why patent applications for e-commerce technologies and business methods have soared in recent years.
Further, the presentation reviews post-Bilski developments in decisions by the courts and at the BPAI through February 27, 2009, with an emphasis on obstacles that clients are currently facing with respect to acquiring patent protection for innovative business methods and computer software.