Byron


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Byron

George Gordon, 6th Baron. 1788--1824, British Romantic poet, noted also for his passionate and disastrous love affairs. His major works include Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812--18), and Don Juan (1819--24). He spent much of his life abroad and died while fighting for Greek independence
References in classic literature ?
Byron struggled to live on 130 pounds a year, in Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, there lived a queer, half-mad, old grand-uncle, who had earned for himself the name of "the wicked lord.
It was in 1807, at the age of nineteen, that Lord Byron published his Hours of Idleness, with a rather pompous preface.
Then after a sneer at Scott for making money by his poems, Byron concludes with this passage:--
But it was not until Byron published his first long poem, called Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, that he became famous.
Then in thought Byron goes over all that took place that fateful day.
For two years Byron was as popular as man might be.
So in anger and disgust, Byron left the country where he found no sympathy.
It was to a great extent a misspent life, and yet, while Byron wasted himself in unworthy ways, he wrote constantly and rapidly, pouring out volumes of poetry at a speed equaled only by Scott.
When Byron left England he fled from the contempt of his fellows.
And this struggle woke all that was generous in the heart of Byron, the worn man of the world.
Mr Pitt in a nightcap and bedgown, and without his boots, represented the poet Cowper with perfect exactness; and Mary Queen of Scots in a dark wig, white shirt-collar, and male attire, was such a complete image of Lord Byron that the young ladies quite screamed when they saw it.
Byron's, which hit the headlines when Chancellor George Osborne was pictured working on his 2013 budget while scoff-ing a "Classic" Byron burger, has plans to open in Newcastle.