Byssus


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Byssus

 

(1) An excretion of the byssal gland, found in the so-called feet of many bivalve mollusks. Immediately upon expulsion, byssus hardens and forms durable silky filaments by which mollusks fasten themselves to underwater objects. In antiquity a special cloth, vysson, was prepared from the byssus excreted by the large mollusk pinna.

(2) A roe disease of freshwater fish caused by certain fungi of the genera Saprolegnia and Achy la.

References in periodicals archive ?
Many researchers have studied mussel glue before," Qin said, referring to the sticky substance that anchors byssus threads to a surface.
1) from Mytilus edulis byssus gland: purification, partial characterization and application for screening products with potential antifouling activities.
This can be achieved acoustically over the region SWB, by backscatter contrast mapping for mussel reefs, which form as a result of the interaction between tidally moved sand and the long-term anchoring effect of horse mussel byssus, but not for mussel populations in other geological provinces where backscatter contrasts are notably absent.
What's more, it was a chemical match with the mussels' own byssus, the researchers report in the Jan.
KEY WORDS: ocean acidification, temperature, mussels, Mytilus coruscus, byssus, antipredation
Byssus binds more powerfully, more rapidly and more persistently to more hard surfaces than any synthetic adhesive for underwater applications, Waite says.
They grow in large colonies on gravel, rocks, or any firm surface; each is bound to the bed by a tuft of another threads called the byssus or beard.
Scallops of the smallest sizes were either collected as free-swimming individuals or were found attached by their byssus either in crevices or to the underside of rocks.
Moreover, many other silk-like biomaterials such as elastin, collagen, byssus, resilin, and other repetitive proteins have similar features to spider silk protein.
It soon drops the byssus and maintains itself beneath the sediment surface with its foot (Carriker, 1961).