Byzantine


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Byzantine

1. of, characteristic of, or relating to Byzantium or the Byzantine Empire
2. of, relating to, or characterizing the Orthodox Church or its rites and liturgy
3. of or relating to the highly coloured stylized form of religious art developed in the Byzantine Empire
4. of or relating to the style of architecture developed in the Byzantine Empire, characterized by massive domes with square bases, rounded arches, spires and minarets, and the extensive use of mosaics
5. denoting the Medieval Greek spoken in the Byzantine Empire
www.archaeolink.com/byzantine_civilization.htm
www.metmuseum.org/explore/Byzantium/art.html
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Byzantine

(jargon, architecture)
A term describing any system that has so many labyrinthine internal interconnections that it would be impossible to simplify by separation into loosely coupled or linked components.

The city of Byzantium, later renamed Constantinople and then Istanbul, and the Byzantine Empire were vitiated by a bureaucratic overelaboration bordering on lunacy: quadruple banked agencies, dozens or even scores of superfluous levels and officials with high flown titles unrelated to their actual function, if any.

Access to the Emperor and his council was controlled by powerful and inscrutable eunuchs and by rival sports factions.

[Edward Gibbon, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire"].
References in periodicals archive ?
The textbooks say the Byzantine Empire was a theocratic autocracy uniting church and state under an all-powerful emperor believed by the Byzantines to be God's viceroy and vicar.
This important ancient settlement provides an impressive sequence of continuous occupation from Nabataean times (first century BC), when it was known as Hawara, through the Roman and Byzantine periods (first to seventh centuries AD) under the names of Hauarra/Hauana and Auara, and finally, as Humayma during the Ummayad period, after which the site was abandoned by the mid-eighth century.
Common to studio practice, Byzantine potters trailed slip as a design on the base clay.
The three manuscripts are a Heirmologion (1764), an Anthologia (late eighteenth or early nineteenth century), and a Doxastika (early nineteenth century), volumes of Greek sacred chant and hymns with musical notation in late Byzantine neumes, intended for use in the Greek Orthodox Church.
This grand imperial medallion depicts a remarkable series of illustrations from the story of the life of Christ as related by early Christian texts, of which some have no peer or parallel in surviving Byzantine precious metal art.
The Battle of Malazgirt (Manzikert) was fought between the Byzantine Empire and the Seljuq Turks on August 26, 1071 near Malazgirt town.
The Byzantine antiquities in the Kremlin museums, one of the great such collections in the world, provide eloquent testimony to the length and importance of that relationship.
Supply, transportation and installation twenty-two (22) museum showcases (P1-P22) and subbase for the needs of the exhibition space of the permanent exhibition of the Byzantine Museum in Barracks Kapodistrias Argolis Argos
It is the first time the scroll of Princess Eudokia Doukas - one of only two known examples from the entire Byzantine period of an illustrated prayer scroll where the original owner can be named - has been on display in public.
The scroll is one of only two known examples from the entire Byzantine period of a private prayer scroll where the identity of the original owner is known.
since he is descended from the last Byzantine emperor, Constantine XI.
Andreas had brought me to this tiny chapel at Cyprus University, in the island's capital Nicosia, to show me where he had started out as an icon painter and where the current revival of interest in traditional Byzantine icon painting had begun.