charge-coupled device

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charge-coupled device

See CCD.

charge-coupled device

[′chärj ¦kəp·əld di′vīs]
(electronics)
A semiconductor device wherein minority charge is stored in a spatially defined depletion region (potential well) at the surface of a semiconductor and is moved about the surface by transferring this charge to similar adjacent wells. Abbreviated CCD.

charge-coupled device

(electronics)
(CCD) A semiconductor technology used to build light-sensitive electronic devices such as cameras and image scanners. CCDs can be made to detect either colour or black-and-white. Each CCD chip consists of an array of light-sensitive photocells. The photocell is sensitised by giving it an electrical charge prior to exposure.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the optical brilliance of its L-series 28-200mm lens, the eight megapixel CCD imaging sensor, and its compact size, the Canon PowerShot Pro1 model is feature-packed and provides the ultimate combination of professional features and simplicity in a digital camera.
2 megapixel CCD imaging sensor and exclusive DIGIC image processor, the PowerShot S1 IS digital camera provides the high quality resolution, color and low noise consumers have come to expect from Canon digital technology starting with the fast f/2.
system that integrates patented fiber-optic CCD imaging with
The 6510 system here will join the long-established installed base of Tegal 6500 production systems already being utilized in the Japan market for manufacturing important consumer products like video game chips and CCD imaging devices," said Jim McKibben, Tegal's vice president of worldwide sales and marketing.
Other CMOS or CCD imaging solutions produce saturation or deep shadow in such scenes, making them risky and unfit for automotive applications.
Leveraging this expertise in consumer digital still camera technology, Analog Devices now offers devices for CMOS and CCD imaging sensors used in high-end digital still cameras and camcorders and in high-performance scientific and industrial imaging applications, such as machine vision, biomedical imaging, and crash-test analysis.