CCR5


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CCR5

(medicine)
Belonging to the seven-transmembrane chemokine receptor family, the major cofactor for primary macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 strains.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a key role in the early memory CD8+ T cell response to respiratory virus infections.
CCR5 antagonists, both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules, are a promising new class of investigational HIV drugs in active development, but it will be extremely important to protect patients on these drugs from bites by WNV-carrying mosquitoes.
CCR5 Genotyping: DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers for CCR5, which were, Primer sense: 5' ACC AGA TCT CAA AAA GAA 3' and Primer anti-sense: 5' CAT GAT GGT GAA GAT AAG CCT CA 3', GenBank Accession number: AF009962.
PRO 140 is a novel monoclonal antibody that binds CCR5 and is designed to prevent HIV from entering immune system cells and thereby prevent viral replication, which occurs within the cells.
Researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have now shown, however, that CCR5 is also expressed in breast cancer cells, and regulates the spread to other tissue.
As noted above, maraviroc doesn't block the virus; it blocks a natural human protein, CCR5.
genes for CCR5 receptors were the very ones who were resistant to acquiring
17, 2005 Journal of Experimental Medicine, Murphy's team found that all animals genetically engineered to lack CCR5 died when exposed to West Nile virus.
Three CCR5 entry inhibitors have recently been in large clinical trials: aplaviroc from GlaxoSmithKline, maraviroc from Pfizer, and vicriviroc from Schering Plough.
Contrasting genetic influence of CCR2 and CCR5 variants on HIV-1 infection and disease progression.
Like a young man who chooses a partner at a dance, but quickly loses interest and selacts another partner, the HIV virus initially `dates' CCR5, but very quickly begins to mutate and loses its affinity for this co-receptor.
The gene suppresses a protein (a substance all living things need to grow), called CCR5, which HIV latches on to when attacking a macrophage.