CCR5

(redirected from CCR5 receptor)
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CCR5

(medicine)
Belonging to the seven-transmembrane chemokine receptor family, the major cofactor for primary macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 strains.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CCR5 receptor is a co-receptor on the cell surface that, together with CD4, mediates the binding of HIV and its entry into the cell.
Schering-Plough today reported that results from an ongoing Phase II clinical trial showed vicriviroc, its investigational CCR5 receptor antagonist, demonstrated potent and sustained viral suppression after 24 weeks of therapy in 118 treatment-experienced HIV patients, when administered in once-daily doses in combination with an optimized ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI)-containing antiretroviral regimen.
Importantly, Euroscreen's patent estate is the first to establish a direct role for the CCR5 receptor in HIV infection.
Multiple copies of this so-called CCR5 receptor sit on the surface of each CD4 T cell.
A polymorphism in the CCR5 receptor gene, in particular, has prompted a great deal of research.
Unlike currently available antiretroviral drugs, PRO 140 does not target the virus, but rather binds to the CCR5 receptor on healthy immune system cells and thereby protects them from viral infection.
About SB-728-T Sangamo's drug, SB-728-T, is generated by ZFN-mediated modification of the gene encoding the CCR5 receptor in a patient's own T-cells.
Individuals who naturally lack the CCR5 receptor have been found to be essentially resistant to HIV.
Schering-Plough Corporation (NYSE: SGP) today provided an update on vicriviroc, its investigational CCR5 receptor antagonist, currently being evaluated by the NIH-sponsored Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) in an ongoing Phase II clinical study of 118 U.
Another drug that blocks the CCR5 receptor, made by Progenics Pharmaceuticals Inc.
SCH C: Safety and antiviral effects of a CCR5 receptor antagonist in HIV-1 infected subjects.
The CCR5 receptor is used by the most prevalent HIV strains, while the CCR2 receptor is rarely used by viruses, says Robert W.