Carrier Grade Linux

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Carrier Grade Linux

A specification that defines an industrial strength operating system environment using Linux. Carrier Grade Linux (CGL) covers hardware, availability, clustering, security, serviceability and performance. Originally from the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), which became the Linux Foundation (see Linux Foundation).
References in periodicals archive ?
CGL had also left the handwritten notes of recent teenage clients undergoing counselling on the wall.
The majority of discussions of the CGL policy deal primarily with the standard provisions of the Insurance Services Office (ISO) form.
The CGL policy was originally conceived in 1973 to enable businesses to purchase protection against various forms of liability; this kind of coverage previously required several policies, according to Katten.
This is usually done by issuing an endorsement to the CGL form, adding the other entity as an insured.
Antitrust and copyright infringement claims may also trigger the personal and advertising injury provisions of a CGL policy.
In February 2014, a New York state court ruled that Zurich American Insurance Company did not have a duty to defend Sony under a CGL policy for liability arising out of the hacking of Sony's PlayStation online services.
CGL, a subsidiary of US real estate operator Hunt Companies Inc, will acquire for MXN1.
You may hear, "You can't sue someone under the same CGL policy that covers you, that would be allowing you to sue yourself.
A high level delegation from CMI-FPE, led by Jean Gourp, managing director, and Deepak Khanna, chief operating officer, recently finalised the details of the CGL supply, ahead of the signing later this month of a formal contract for engineering, supply, erection and commissioning of the line.
of Altamonte Springs, offers a few annual premium cost and coverage examples: CGL for a large nationwide bus company 2/2/2 limits, $48,500 per year; condo association 1/2/2, limits $4,200; convenience store 1/1/1 limits, $2,276; and commercial construction account 1/2/2 limits, $12,500.
The court's reliance on the nature of the damages essentially sidesteps the definition of "occurrence" included in CGL policies in order to reach a result that is not actually supported by the language of most CGL policies but which is to the advantage of construction companies.
Whenever the issue of "c,c,c" is raised in a CGL context, invariably the entire discussion seems to assume we are only talking personal property bailments, such as our specific claim in last month's article.