child

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Related to CHILD syndrome: battered child syndrome, Only child syndrome

child

[chīld]
(computer science)
An element that follows a given element in a data structure.
In object-oriented programming, a subclass.

child

child

(1) In database management, the data that is dependent on its parent. See parent-child.

(2) A component that is subordinate to a higher-level component. See child menu, child program and child window.

Child

(dreams)
Some people have reoccurring dreams about a small child, while others, from time to time, dream about unfamiliar children. The child in your dream could represent your inner self, or the child within. The dream could be based on childhood memories, and it may carry a specific message or bring up long-buried issues. On the other hand, the dream could simply be a pleasant memory. Children in dreams could symbolize a need and an eagerness to learn, simplicity, intuition, new endeavors, and many other positive attributes of childhood. Occasionally, the child in your dreams may be pointing to your own childish ways. Therefore, consider all of the details and the tone of the dream before making an interpretation.
References in periodicals archive ?
I suppose I suffer from middle child syndrome, among other syndromes including, while I stand on this pinnacle here, a feeling of 'impostor' syndrome
I truly believe middle child syndrome exists and that they often feel a bit lost and unsure of their place in the family.
According to the media, say the book's authors, Catherine Salmon and Katrin Schumann, middle children are often portrayed with the nebulous label 'middle child syndrome.
Many adopt a hard-done-by attitude, sometimes referred to as middle child syndrome.
She offers ideas for rules and solutions for food issues, progress charts for school, introduction of "rituals" to create consistency, early sex lessons, considerations for contact with birth parents, games that encourage bonding and trust, describing and dealing with family history, managing emotions and behavioral difficulties (including through "dumping sessions"), determining consequences for problem behavior, and managing second child syndrome, among other issues.
In Chapter 2, the author provides four profiles of how children project the uncaring child syndrome, including:

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