CITES


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CITES:

see Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
References in periodicals archive ?
The CITES is an international agreement between governments, which aims to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.
The divisions of Management Authority and Scientific Authority handle CITES permitting, policy, and regulatory activities, working closely with other federal and state agencies.
Because reprinting previously published articles in books is desirable from a social perspective (it helps to disseminate knowledge further), it is important to adopt a citing practice that encourages journals to permit such reprinting, thus providing another justification for the proposed practice to cite the original article rather than the book chapter.
this information gap, CITES parties export species without undertaking
Misconception #1: CITES and ESA listing categories are the same.
Next week, CITES member nations are scheduled to consider relaxing ivory-trade restrictions in countries where elephants are relatively abundant.
The CITES working group that recommended the listing was chaired by Amanda Vincent, the group's cofounder and director.
Gagnon cites a sociological study, Le Catholicisme Quebecois (Editions de l'QRC, 2000) by Lemieux and Montminy, worthy but incomplete attempt to diagnose a situation which was ignored by the predominantly Marxist-type of research done during the 1970s.
Alterman expresses dismay that Coulter and Rush Limbaugh get away with venomous remarks about liberals, while Goldberg cites some pretty venomous remarks Nina Totenberg and other liberals have made about conservatives.
Nonetheless, Members of Congress who ask for "blue ribbon panels" should be more cautious in selecting studies to cite when sounding public alarms.
Darling-Hammond cites another study (Greenwald, Hedges, and Laine 1996 in support of her contention that states need to increase their investments in teacher education.
With 125 cites from September 1998 (when she started here) to June 1999, she would rank in the top three most cited scholars (not including Aslund).