coercion

(redirected from coerce)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
..... Click the link for more information.
 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
..... Click the link for more information.
. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
..... Click the link for more information.
; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
In one, Taiwan will restrict trade only if it is politics-first; in the other, China will coerce only if it is politics-first.
First, a potential threatener may be trying to coerce you by threatening to crush you with an avalanche if you take the northern path.
Dubai: Three men have been accused of kidnapping a worker and locking him up in a flat to coerce his father to waive his ownership of a property in their home country.
fines for code violations and threats of legal action) to persuade or coerce nonoffending third parties, typically the property owner or manager, to take action against criminal or nuisance behavior.
The ACLJ urges the state's highest court not to take the case: "The Petition for Review should be denied because the clear purpose and effect of Proposition A is to preserve a historically significant war memorial, not to proselytize a particular religious viewpoint or coerce any religious activity," the brief concludes.
The OIR's chief attorney, Michael Gennaco, said he was most disturbed by the large number of misconduct cases involving ``intentional and conscious wrongdoing,'' including the cases of two deputies indicted in August on charges of using their position and the threat of arrest to coerce victims into sexual acts.
The Fifth Amendment says the state can't coerce a confession," he explains.
The police in Tucker did not coerce the defendant to make the statement and, therefore, did not violate his Fifth Amendment right against compelled self-incrimination.
Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a public university cannot coerce student participation in religious practices.
Making a Mobius strip out of paper is one thing, but now a team of Japanese researchers has found a way to coerce a single crystal into the same shape.
It is one more example of the arrogance of homosexual activists in their campaign to coerce acceptance of their abominable lifestyle.