COOL


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cool

1. (of a colour) having violet, blue, or green predominating; cold
2. (of jazz) characteristic of the late 1940s and early 1950s, economical and rhythmically relaxed

COOL

(1)

COOL

(2)
CLIPS Object-Oriented Language?

COOL

(3)
A C++ class library developed at Texas Instruments that defines containers like Vectors, List, Hash_Table, etc. It uses a shallow hierarchy with no common base class. The functionality is close to Common Lisp data structures (like libg++). The template syntax is very close to Cfront 3.x and g++ 2.x.

JCOOL's main difference from COOL and GECOOL is that it uses real C++ templates instead of a similar syntax that is preprocessed by a special 'cpp' distributed with COOL and GECOOL.

ftp://csc.ti.com/pub/COOL.tar.Z.

GECOOL, JCOOL: ftp://cs.utexas.edu/pub/COOL/.

E-mail: Van-Duc Nguyen <nguyen@crd.ge.com>

CooL

(language)
Combined object-oriented Language.

An object-oriented language from the ITHACA Esprit project, which combines C-based languages with database technology.

COOL

A family of tools from Sterling Software for modeling and developing enterprise applications for every major hardware platform. Later owned and marketed by Computer Associates (CA), which purchased Sterling Software in 2000, the product line continues to provide business and data modeling for the enterprise. Look for the COOL products under the CA name of "Advantage Developer Series."
References in periodicals archive ?
Peyser says clean ambient-cooled water from the outdoor heat exchanger is sufficient to cool press hydraulics, but water temperature and flow rate for molds requires some fine tuning.
This one is cool and laid-back, this Brazilian dance that's just classy and traditional.
If you feel sick or light headed, get out of the sun, drink cool liquids, and cool down.
After the trees are planted at Cool Communities sites by hundreds of volunteers, information will be collected over the next five years.
I may be cool, Beavis, but I can't change the future," Butt-head remarks, in a rare moment of clarity.
Although that's not an especially impressive number, it adds up--an estimated 3 to 8 percent of current national urban electricity demand is used to cool our communities, at a cost of up to $1 million an hour.
However, this insert has water passages inside that allow cool water to pass and draw heat from the huh at a faster rate.
Hofmann envisions that in 2 years, chocolates, citrus drinks, water, shower gels, toothpaste, or other products could use one of the new chemicals to provide a nonminty cool.
Cool, 34, a Simi Valley software engineer and occasional surfer, has developed a Web site on the Internet called Wave-Cast through which surfers subscribing to the service can get updates on forecasts for wave conditions from San Diego to Santa Barbara.
Circulating heat-transfer fluid temperature-control systems with a temperature range to 600 F incorporate a cool oil reservoir that eliminates thermal shock associated with in-line shell and tube heat exchanger.
The paper concluded that the best sand for molding was fully mulled, cool sand below 120F.
In the rete, hot blood surging from the heart via the carotid artery flows into smaller arteries surrounded by cool blood returning from the nose and face.