electrode

(redirected from CWE)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

electrode,

terminal through which electric current passes between metallic and nonmetallic parts of an electric circuit. In most familiar circuits current is carried by metallic conductors, but in some circuits the current passes for some distance through a nonmetallic conductor. For example, in electrolysiselectrolysis
, passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process. The Electrolytic Process

The electrolytic process requires that an electrolyte, an ionized solution or molten metallic salt, complete an
..... Click the link for more information.
 current passes through a liquid electrolyte; in a fluorescent lamp current passes through a gas. An electrode is usually in the form of a wire, rod, or plate. It may be made of a metal, e.g., copper, lead, platinum, silver, or zinc, or of a nonmetal, commonly carbon. The electrode through which current passes from the metallic to the nonmetallic conductor is called the anode, and that through which current passes from the nonmetallic to the metallic conductor, the cathode. (Electron flow is in a direction opposite that of conventionally defined current.) In most familiar electric devices, current flows from the terminal at higher electric potential (the positive electrode) to the terminal at lower electric potential (the negative electrode); therefore, the anode is usually the positive electrode and the cathode the negative electrode. In some electric devices, e.g., an electric battery, nonelectric energy is converted to electric energy, causing current to flow within the device from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, so that the anode is the negative electrode and the cathode is the positive electrode.

Electrode

 

a structural component of an electronic, ion, or electrical engineering device or production apparatus. It consists of a conductor with a specific shape, which connects a section of an electric circuit in contact with a working medium—a vacuum (in the practical sense), gas, semiconductor, or liquid—to the remainder of the circuit (which is formed by conductors).

The electrodes of electronic devices (electron tubes, electronbeam instruments, semiconductor devices, and so on) are usually in the form of a plate, grid, cylinder, or the like. They have a wide variety of functions. For example, as cathodes and photocathodes, they act as sources of electrons; as grids (control, shield, and suppressor types) and the electrodes of electron guns, they are used to create within a device electric fields that control the motion of electrons and ions in the working medium; as anodes (plates), they collect electrons.


Electrode

 

in electrochemistry, a metal, oxide, or other electrical conductor in contact with an ionic conductor, such as an electrolytic solution or a fused electrolyte. The most important characteristic of electrodes is the electrode potential established at the electrode-electrolyte boundary. Depending on use, electrodes may be classified as reference, indicator, and other types. Systems of two different electrodes can be used as chemical sources of current; when direct current passes through such systems, they act as electrolytic cells.

electrode

[i′lek‚trōd]
(electricity)
An electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
One of the terminals used in dielectric heating or diathermy for applying the high-frequency electric field to the material being heated.

electrode

1. In arc welding, the component in a welding circuit through which an electric current is conducted between the electrode holder and the arc.
2.In resistance welding, the component through which the electric current in the welding machine passes (usually accompanied by pressure) directly to the work.

electrode

1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes

electrode

A device that emits, controls or receives electricity. Typically an end point or wire made of metal or some composite material, there are countless electrodes in electrical and electronics products. For example, in a vacuum tube, the cathode emitter is a "negative" electrode. The transparent wires made of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) that cross an LCD screen are electrodes. See battery, air interface and cathode.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through Worcester's Small Business Service Bureau, she learned about CWE and cannot say enough about what the classes have done for her, most important for this woman who already had a business background, by encouraging her.
The four remaining CWE volumes under review all share the virtue of placing notes at the bottom of the page rather than at the end of the text.
Caption for graphic 1: Selection of the CWE standard from with TBvision
When asked whether CWE planned to collaborate with that organization as well, Rittscher said CWE had good existing relations with the group.
Stockholders and investors are urged to read the proxy statement/prospectus, and other relevant documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding the transaction, because they will contain important information about Pulaski Financial and CWE, the merger, the persons soliciting proxies in the merger and their interests in the merger and related matters.
As we stated at the end of our fiscal year, one of the prerequisites of CWE becoming successful again is the acceptance by our creditors of greatly extended payment terms," Kinkel said.
Kinkel, Chairman of the Board of Directors of CWE, commented that, "Although CWE will write-off substantially all of its investment in CSI, this transaction will reduce our debt load and enable us to concentrate our attention and resources on our core stores in Denver.
Springboard and CWE are here to educate, coach and provide access to funding so that these companies commercialize their research and their technologies.
CWE used the net cash proceeds from this sale to repay a portion of its indebtedness to DFS.
Highly encouraging results were obtained from the selective drilling program undertaken by CWE and confirms that the company controlled acreage offers excellent potential for a new economic discovery.
Kinnear, president and CEO or Cherie Quaintance, Investor Relations, of CWE, 303-866-9840/
She leads by example, is highly successful and deeply involved with CWE.