Candide

(redirected from Cacambo)
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Candide

the hero and his relatives and friends stoically undergo an endless series of misfortunes. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]

Candide

beset by inconceivable misfortunes, hero indifferently shrugs them off. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]

Candide

a wanderer in search of best of all possible worlds. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, by comparison with the Christians he has encountered, who blatantly steal his wealth without paying him anything, and the Moslem Turkish ship captain, who dubs him a "dog of a Christian," and who, like the deposed Sultan who owned his friend Cacambo, charges him an exorbitant ransom for Pangloss and the Baron, the Jew is a model of civility, fairness and good will.
Thanks to Jewish bankers, Candide acquires the funds to ransom Cacambo, the Baron and Pangloss from the brutish Turks.
For instance, early in the conte he tells Cacambo, "Venice.
On the other hand, once he becomes socially downtrodden and dispossessed, the discontented outsider Candide and the disconsolate, destitute, aimless people he meets on his travels--the Old Woman, Cacambo, and Martin--quarrel with Pangloss's pedagogy.
Cooke's love, a London whore named Joan Toast and his servant Bernard are postmodern reorchestrations of Voltaire's female character Mile Cunegonde and Candide's servant Cacambo.
Candide's lady grows ugly and repulsive, and becomes more bitter every day, the Old Woman complains about her infirmities, Cacambo also curses his destiny and Pangloss broods over his lost chance of becoming a famous philosopher.