Candide

(redirected from Cacambo)

Candide

the hero and his relatives and friends stoically undergo an endless series of misfortunes. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]

Candide

beset by inconceivable misfortunes, hero indifferently shrugs them off. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]

Candide

a wanderer in search of best of all possible worlds. [Fr. Lit.: Candide]
References in periodicals archive ?
Con perspicacia, Zavaleta le retruca que Cacambo es un sirviente, mientras el sueco insiste en que estar al servicio del espiritu enaltece.
One of the more troubling characters for a modern reading is the Count's mute, black servant Ali, at least before we realize his type is Cacambo, who appears in chapter thirteen of Candide, "a valet of the type one often finds in the provinces of Spain and in the colonies," something of a halfbreed, and impossibly fond of his master.
Later, the transition of Candide and his valet Cacambo into the lost world of El Dorado after they enter a tunnel was depicted using a psychedelic videographic effect, with streaks of colour receding quickly behind a medium two shot of the characters, in a sequence reminiscent of (but less sophisticated and sustained than) the 'Star Gate' sequence in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).
Estas dicotomias, pero especialmente el sueno racionalista, fueron maravillosamente caricaturizadas posteriormente por Voltaire a traves de Cacambo, en Candido.
Pangloss and Others Larry Yando Candide Geoff Packard Cunegonde Lauren Molina Maximilian and Others Erik Lochtefeld Paquette and Others Margo Seibert Baroness, Vanderdendur and Others Rebecca Finnegan Baron, Martin and Others Tom Aulino Cacambo and Others Jesse J.
David Williams regards the episode's "possible purpose as a symbol of human aspiration" that reminds Candide and Cacambo "that there is always a better world, that solutions to some problems can be found, and that the human struggle against evil is not entirely futile" and that ultimately enables them to act willfully without the "paralysis of Optimism" (60-1).
On the other hand, once he becomes socially downtrodden and dispossessed, the discontented outsider Candide and the disconsolate, destitute, aimless people he meets on his travels--the Old Woman, Cacambo, and Martin--quarrel with Pangloss's pedagogy.
The first meal enjoyed by Candide and his servant Cacambo in Eldorado is a perfect illustration of this:
Cooke's love, a London whore named Joan Toast and his servant Bernard are postmodern reorchestrations of Voltaire's female character Mile Cunegonde and Candide's servant Cacambo.
They also hint at 'caca', which is the cue for Cacambo.