Donor

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Related to Cadaveric Donor: cadaveric transplant

donor

1. Med any person who voluntarily gives blood, skin, a kidney etc., for use in the treatment of another person
2. Law
a. a person who makes a gift of property
b. a person who bestows upon another a power of appointment over property
3. Chemistry the atom supplying both electrons in a coordinate bond
4. Physics an impurity, such as antimony or arsenic, that is added to a semiconductor material in order to increase its n-type conductivity by contributing free electrons

Donor

 

in medieval and Renaissance art and sometimes in the art of later periods, a representation of the builder of the church holding a model of the structure in his hands or of the patron who had ordered the painting, more rarely, sculpture or work of decorative applied art. The donor usually stands before Christ and the Virgin Mary or the saints.


Donor

 

a person giving his own blood for transfusion, or tissue (for example, skin) or an organ (for example, a kidney) for transplantation in a patient (the recipient). At the present stage of science the most widely found form of donation is blood donation. In the USSR donation is a voluntary act. Any healthy (according to a special medical examination), physically mature person 18 years of age and older can become a donor. The giving of blood is harmless for the donor. The health of the donor is protected, and in the USSR the donors have benefits. They are permitted to leave work with pay in order to give blood, and after giving blood they receive a day off with pay from the institution where they are employed. Donors are the first to receive permits to stay at sanatoriums and rest homes. The Executive Committee of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has established an award for donors, the badge Honorary Donor of the USSR.

donor

[′dō·nər]
(solid-state physics)
An impurity that is added to a pure semiconductor material to increase the number of free electrons. Also known as donor impurity; electron donor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although financially compensating either family members of cadaveric donors or live donors for organs is illegal, there are ways that financial incentives have been introduced, which could directly or indirectly affect the donation of organs for transplant.
Estimates suggest that we are presently harvesting only about half of the potential number of cadaveric donors.
About 80 per cent of my patients now bring their own donor with them to appointments, so the split between living and cadaveric donors here is about 50:50 now.
First, suitable cadaveric donors must be identified in a timely fashion.
More than 493 kidney transplants have been undertaken at HDH during the past 12 years--351 from cadaveric donors and 147 from living donors.
10) All sites receiving potential cadaveric donors would have professional in-house donor coordinators, (11) and the cost of these, as well as the medical and administrative costs associated with facilitating organ donation from these sites, would be reimbursed by the Ministry of Health.
Although the supply of cadaveric donors may never satisfy the demand for organs for transplantation, cadaveric donors will remain an important, if not the most important, supply of organs for the foreseeable future.
According to OPTN data as of August 3, 2001, 5,984 cadaveric donors were recovered and more than 17,000 transplants from cadaveric donors were performed for the year 2000.
American Medical Association, Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, "Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement: Ethical Aspects of Future Contracts for Cadaveric Donors," Archives of Internal Medicine 155 (1995): 589-91.
there are practices occurring in hospitals and morgues where they do in fact take cadaveric donors without consent,'' Scheper-Hughes said.