cadaver

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cadaver

Med a corpse

cadaver

[kə′dav·ər]
(medicine)
A dead animal or human body to be studied by dissection.
References in periodicals archive ?
In male cadavers, the minimum length between those two arteries was 0.
A few weeks into medical school, or, more accurately, into anatomy lab, I told my grandparents that while what they chose to do with themselves after they died was their decision, I was quite disturbed with the idea of their becoming the lab cadavers my classmates and I were using.
UC officials said cadaver donation programs are important to scientific research and they will work to develop guidelines to make sure they are run appropriately.
It also ensures cadavers and animal by-products are not recycled for animal feed.
Other training methods use live animals that die after the procedure and cadavers without blood or other fluids.
He added, "RHAKOSS is specifically designed to offer patients the advantages of a synthetic bone repair product - eliminating the risk of disease transmission associated with the use of cadaver tissue, and offering more consistent levels of purity, quality and availability - while closely mimicking the desired characteristics of human bone.
In this narrative, de' Mussi makes two important claims about the siege of Caffa and the Black Death: that plague was transmitted to Europeans by the hurling of diseased cadavers into the besieged city of Caffa and that Italians fleeing from Caffa brought it to the Mediterranean ports.
While von Hagens insists all his cadavers donated their bodies to science while still alive, it seems to me highly unlikely, even impossible, that such an act is consistent with a holy death.
As a result of the proximity to the gross anatomy laboratory, the faculty explored using cadavers as a teaching aid.
com), on view through September 2, features plastinated cadavers carrying their skins nonchalantly over one arm or striking marathon-runner poses, their muscles peeling off their bones in the anatomical equivalent of cartoon speed lines.
That was the conclusion of a pilot study of the pull-out strength of presacral fascia in 11 female cadavers.