Caen


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Caen

(käN), city (1990 pop. 115,624), capital of Calvados dept., N France, in Normandy, on the Orne River. It is a busy port, canalized (by Napoleon I) directly to the sea. The commercial center of the rich CalvadosCalvados
, department (1990 pop. 621,300), in Normandy, N France, on the English Channel. Caen is the capital.
..... Click the link for more information.
 region, it is highly industrialized, with a thermal power station and extensive steelworks along the Orne; the nearby iron-ore mines are among the largest in France. The city's manufactures include motor vehicle parts, electronic gear, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and paper. Caen's importance dates from the 11th cent., when it was a favorite residence of William IWilliam I
or William the Conqueror,
1027?–1087, king of England (1066–87). Earnest and resourceful, William was not only one of the greatest of English monarchs but a pivotal figure in European history as well.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of England (William the Conqueror). During the French Revolution it was a rallying place for the federalists; Charlotte CordayCorday, Charlotte
(Marie Anne Charlotte Corday d'Armont) , 1768–93, assassin of Jean Paul Marat. Although of aristocratic background, she sympathized with the Girondists in the French Revolution and felt that Marat, in his persecution of the Girondists, was acting as the
..... Click the link for more information.
 lived there.

The town, an architectural gem, was largely destroyed by bombardment during the Normandy campaignNormandy campaign,
June to Aug., 1944, in World War II. The Allied invasion of the European continent through Normandy began about 12:15 AM on June 6, 1944 (D-day). The plan, known as Operation Overlord, had been prepared since 1943; supreme command over its execution was
..... Click the link for more information.
 of World War II; the 14th-century Church of St. Peter's lost its famous spire, while the castle of William the Conqueror and the town hall (17th cent.) were destroyed beyond repair. However, three outstanding examples of 11th-century Norman architectureNorman architecture,
term applied to the buildings erected by the Normans in all lands that fell under their dominion. It is used not only in England and N France, but also in S Italy (Apulia) and in Sicily.
..... Click the link for more information.
 were preserved: the Abbaye aux Hommes [men's abbey], founded by William the Conqueror, who is buried there; the Abbaye aux Dames [women's abbey], founded by Queen Matilda; and the Church of St. Nicholas. The university (founded 1432 and also destroyed) has been rebuilt; in 1964 its technical institute became the National School of Advanced Electronics and Electromechanic Studies. A school of hydrography is also in Caen.

Caen

 

a city and port in northern France (Normandy), on the Orne River, near the coast of the English Channel, with which it is linked by a ship canal. It is the administrative center of Calvados department. Population, 114, 000 (1968). There is a metallurgical industry, as well as machine-building, textile, chemical, cement, ceramic, food, and woodworking enterprises. Coal is imported in large amounts to meet the needs of the lower Normandy iron-ore region, of which Caen is the center. Dairy products and wine are among the city’s exports.

Caen was founded in the early 11th century, and its university was founded in 1432. Architectural monuments include the Romanesque churches of La Trinité (1059-66) and St. Nicholas (end of the 11th century), an 1 lth-century castle, the Church of St. Peter (13-14th centuries, rebuilt in the 16th century in Early Renaissance style), the late Gothic Church of St. John (15th century), the baroque Notre-Dame-de-la-Gloriette (17th century), the ruins of the Hôtel d’Escoville (1538), and the monastery with its Romanesque church of St. Etienne (1064-77) and buildings from the early 18th century (now a lycée). Caen was rebuilt after its destruction in 1944. New avenues were laid out in the center, and in 1957 the university campus was completed (architects, H. Bernard and E. Hur). A museum of fine arts is located here.

REFERENCE

Doré, R. Caen et Bayeux. Caen, 1950.

Caen

an industrial city in NW France. Pop.: 113 987 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
Two minutes later though Lyon showed defensive frailty as a long hopeful clearance from Caen keeper Vincent Plante was totally misjudged by Sebastien Squillaci.
The University of Caen also had the three higher faculties of theology, law, and medicine, but the surviving records do not permit an estimate of the number of students, which was surely quite low.
Despite growing up in San Francisco as the only son of the city's most famous newspaperman, Caen says he had no interest in the news game, and no parental pressure to go in.
In his ponytail and black biker jacket, Thomas summed up in one word a quality he and scores of others said San Francisco now lacks but Caen personified: grace.
The bureau's name-calling surprised some longtime Caen associates, who wished he was still around to make use of this particular scooplet -- or, rather, snooplet.
Diagnosed with inoperable cancer in April 1996, Caen wrote sporadically to the end despite his failing health.
The company turned out to be the hit of the entire event--so much so that it has already returned to Europe twice, and in the months ahead will perform in Aix, Genoa, Nervi, and Caen.
Ann Moller Caen is the retired President of Moller and Associates, a consulting firm.
The Monaco and Angers reverses were in front of Les Sang et Or faithful, while Caen also won August's League Cup clash 2-1.
Herb would have loved it: were the words heard frequently at Grace Cathedral and on a wall; along Herb Caen Way on the waterfront on Feb.
Relegation-haunted Caen faxed Dons on Wednesday and asked the Pittodrie club to name their price for the free-scoring star.
He was showered with the love of Baghdad by the Bay as throngs turned out Friday for Herb Caen Day and the dedication of Herb Caen Way.