Caernarvon


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Caernarvon

(kərnär`vən, kär–), Welsh Caernarfon, town (1981 pop. 9,506), Gwynedd, NW Wales, on Menai Strait. Petroleum is imported and slate exported. Tourism is important. The castle, begun by Edward I c.1284, is a fine example of a medieval fortress. The Prince of Wales is invested at Caernarvon.

Caernarfon

, Caernarvon, Carnarvon
a port and resort in NW Wales, in Gwynedd on the Menai Strait: 13th-century castle. Pop.: 9726 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Queen places the crown on the head of Prince Charles at his <B1969 investiture at Caernarvon Castle
Another got a watercolour the Women's Institute of Caernarvon had given to Diana.
The companies involved are Caernarvon Creameries, Abergavenny Farm Foods, Merlin Cheeses, Caws Celtica, Llanborfy Cheese Makers, Teifi Cheese, Penbryn and Pant Mawr.
lThere is much celebration among the stable staff at Bill Elsey's yard as Farthing, who was given to them by the trainer, pips Caernarvon King (Reg Hollinshead/Tony Ives) at Carlisle.
j AERIAL 2000 aluminium rear drag fixed-spool reels, worth pounds 60 each, are won by Malcolm Owen of Twthill, near Caernarvon for an 11lb 4oz shore pollack and by Peter Wood from Portland, who caught a 2lb 5oz 10dms Chesil Beach whiting.
Other stops on the tour: Portmeirion, Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, Conwy and the castle at Caernarvon.
ESPI) for a proposed hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility in Caernarvon Township, Lancaster County.
1969: Prince Charles (pictured) was invested as Prince of Wales by the Queen at Caernarvon Castle.
Fifty years ago yesterday Alun Jones featured in the Caernarvon and District League team which took on the Anglesey League in a special end of season challenge match, a fixture still played annually to this day.
Whittaker, 46, of Caernarvon Place, Blackwood, pleaded guilty to driving with excess alcohol.
Edward of Caernarvon later became Edward II; the story that father Edward I told the newly-conquered Welsh he would give them "a prince who spoke no English" (as he was too young to speak any language) seems to be a later invention, not recorded until the 16th century.
A hamlet near Cowbridge has the name sign Pentermeyrick; in Bridgend there is a street sign for Heol Quarrella (sic) while a few years ago I passed a road-sign in North Wales for Caernarvon.