Caesarean


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Caesarean

, Caesarian (US), Cesarean, Cesarian
1. of or relating to any of the Caesars, esp Julius Caesar (100--44 bc), Roman general, statesman, and historian
2. Surgery
a. short for Caesarean section
b. (as modifier): Caesarean birth
References in periodicals archive ?
At population level, caesarean section rates higher than 10% are not associated with reductions in maternal and newborn mortality rates.
Over 65 per cent of women had a caesarean in the private sector last year, significantly more than the 38.
Based on the results, the authors noted that "the practice of non-closure of the parietal peritoneum at caesarean delivery should be questioned.
However, we would argue that the lower pregnancy rate among women undergoing caesareans is most likely due to maternal choice to delay pregnancy intentionally for a multitude of reasons (including age, desired family size, financial reasons, etc), rather than any negative effect of a caesarean per se.
Almost one in four babies in England is still delivered by caesarean, despite the increased risks to mother and baby.
We believe minimising the caesarean section rate while providing the safest care for mums and babies is a sign of quality.
My impression is that women are frightened about childbirth, frightened of pain and consider a Caesarean an option.
Maternal request for a Caesarean is said to be the fifth most common reason for performing the operation, after various medical concerns.
NICE executive director Andrew Sutcliffe said: "This guideline is not saying women should not have Caesarean sections, but explains what the evidence shows is best for women and their babies.
That may be a lifestyle decision but what they can't forget is that a Caesarean is a major operation and carries risks.
The ACOG cautions that evidence is still incomplete and that there are not yet sufficient morbidity/mortality data to compare elective Caesarean delivery with vaginal birth in healthy women.