Cahokia

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Cahokia

(kəhō`kēə), village (1990 pop. 17,550), St. Clair co., SW Ill., a residential suburb of East St. Louis, on the Mississippi River; inc. 1927. The first permanent settlement in Illinois, Cahokia's name is derived from a local Native American group. The French established a mission in 1699 and a fur-trading post later. Cahokia was occupied by the British in 1765 and captured by the Americans under George Rogers ClarkClark, George Rogers,
1752–1818, American Revolutionary general, conqueror of the Old Northwest, b. near Charlottesville, Va.; brother of William Clark. A surveyor, he was interested in Western lands, served (1774) in Lord Dunmore's War (see Dunmore, John Murray, 4th earl
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 in 1778. It has several buildings dating from the 18th cent. Parks College, part of St. Louis Univ., is there. Nearby are the Cahokia MoundsCahokia Mounds,
approximately 85 Native American earthworks in Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, SW Ill., near East St. Louis; largest group of mounds N of Mexico. Monks' Mound, a rectangular, flat-topped earthwork, 100 ft (30.5 m) high with a 17-acre (6.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
The illustrations, particularly the pictures that show Cahokian life and architecture during the Mississippian phase, aid the reader in visualizing a complex civilization that existed in prehistoric America.
That is, among other lived experiences and cultural practices, the making, circulation, use, and burial of the axe-heads would have physically embodied the Cahokian regional order as it was coming to be (Pauketat 2004b).
During the brief period of Cahokian consolidation, village resettlement, and village-level pluralism that saw the various axe-head burials, a new collective unity was forged.
Spindle whorls and fiber production at early Cahokian settlements.
Cahokian change and the authority of tradition, in T.
The Knoebel Site: Tradition and Change in the Cahokian Suburbs.
More than mounds: Mississippian ritual in the Cahokian uplands.
Cahokian elite ideology and the Mississippian cosmos, in T.
Figurines, flint clay sourcing, the Ozark highlands, and Cahokian acquisition.
These mountains are the core of the Ozark uplift and are situated immediately south and west of the well-known Burlington chert quarries, galena outcrops, and flintclay sources regularly visited by Cahokians in the northeastern Ozarks (Emerson & Hughes 2000).